Corrections

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Due to a reporting error, this story originally misidentified Hellbender's co-founder. His name is Ben Evans, not Ben Smith.
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Due to a production error, the review originally gave an incorrect URL for Pink Swear's website. It is pinkyswear-productions.com, not pinkyswearproductions.com
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Due to a reporting error, the review originally said that "designer Misha Kachman has outdone herself." Kachman is a man.
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Due to an editing error, the headline of this pick originally misspelled Ensemble Dal Niente's name.
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Due to a reporting error, this story originally misstated which fried produce the Pinch serves. They are pickles, not green tomatoes.
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Due to an editing error, the article originally said the Office of the Deputy Mayor for Planning and Economic Development brokered the city's deal with Pigmental Studios; it was brokered by DMPED and the film office. Due to a reporting error, the article did not mention city government employees who were paid overtime by producers of a Red Bull commercial as part of a shoot. And due to a reporting error, the article the article incorrectly said commercial filming is banned by the Grant Statue in Union Square; U.S. Capitol Police do issue permits to film there.
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Due to a reporting error, this story originally misstated the amount of EB-5 funding in the Marriott Marquis project. It was $5 million, not $25 million, as a document provided by city officials incorrectly indicated.
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Due to a reporting error, this article originally identified the wrong person as the founder of the DC Gurly Show.
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This story has been updated to note that the writer met with the Blade to discuss possible assignments.
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Due to a reporting error, the article originally gave an incorrect date for KhushDC's gala.
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Due to a reporting error, the review said Freud's Last Session takes place in 1838. It is set in 1938.
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Due to a reporting error, the article originally misspelled the name of the band Et At It.
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Due to a reporting error, this article originally misidentified Noah Lennox.
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Due to an editing error, the name of the review's author was originally misspelled.
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Due to a production error, an outdated version of this story was originally published online. It has since been updated to match the one published in this week's print edition.
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Due to a reporting error, the article originally identified At-Large Councilmember David Grosso as the chair of Committee on Business, Consumer and Regulatory Affairs and At-Large Councilmember Vincent Orange as a member of it. In fact, Orange is the chair and Grosso is a member of the committee.
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Due to a reporting error, the review originally said several characters are played by Michael Kevin Darnall. In fact, they are played by Randolph Curtis Rand.
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Due to a reporting error, this story originally misspelled the name of the Dahlonega Residence.
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The article originally gave a misleading example of the naming convention for some bus lines. Although the X2 line starts with a letter like some other bus lines in D.C. and Maryland, its name originated with the Roman numeral for the 10 streetcar line whose route it follows.
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The article originally identified historic Swampoodle as being "centered in the heart of what’s now NoMa around 1st and M streets NE." In fact, it was centered slightly south of that area.
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Due to a reporting error, this feature originally listed an incorrect address for a photo from the 2000 block of Georgia Avenue NW. It was not taken on the 1600 block of Georgia; that address does not exist.
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Due to a reporting error, the review originally misidentified the actor who plays Philia in "A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum." She is Lora Lee Gayer.
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This story originally contained two reporting errors. It listed an incorrect price for the luna beads sold at Lotus Blooms. They are $62. The price of a portable liquor satchel at The Hour was also incorrect. It is $195.
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Due to a web production error, the online version of this story initially misstated the date Hemphill Fine Arts opened. It was 1993, not 1983. Due to a reporting error, the interview with Katie Alice Greer misidentified her band Priests as a trio. The group is a quartet.
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Due to a reporting error, this story originally misstated how much Jack Evans' constituent service fund spent on sports tickets between 2002 and 2011. The fund spent $135,897 on tickets, not $437,720, which is the total amount it spent in that period.
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This review originally contained two reporting errors. It omitted the first name of actor Megan Graves. And it misidentified costume designer Jesse Shipley as Jenny Shipley.
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Due to an editing error, the pick originally gave an incorrect address for Joe’s Record Paradise. It is on Georgia Avenue in Silver Spring, not Georgia Avenue NW.
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Due to a reporting error, this story originally twice misspelled the name of Segs in the City owner Bill Main.
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Due to a reporting error, the article originally misidentified the dance party Blowoff as Blow Up.
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Due to a reporting error, the review originally referred to Elizabeth Catlett as a living artist. She died last year.
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Due to a reporting error, this story originally misquoted the Smithsonian's advertising slogan. It is "Seriously Amazing," not "Simply Amazing."
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Due to an editing error, this story originally had the dates of the elections in 2012 wrong. The Democratic primary was in April 2012, and the Ward 5 special election came a month after that.
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Due to a reporting error, the article originally misidentified the location of the Shrimp Boat, which is on East Capitol Street.
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Due to a reporting error, this story originally misidentified the website Lisa Gansky runs. It is meshing.it, not mesh.it.
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Due to a reporting error, this article originally stated that Leroy Thorpe had been an incumbent ANC commissioner when he lost last year. In fact, he was attempting to win back a seat he had previously held.
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The article originally contained two reporting errors. It misspelled the name of the British music duo Eurythmics. And the International Bear Brotherhood flag was selected at an event of the Chesapeake Bay Bears, not the D.C. Bear Club.
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Due to a reporting error, the article originally misidentified Jay Winter Nightwolf as James Winter Nightwolf.
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Due to a reporting error, the review originally described Dreamgirls as being 21 years old. In fact, it is 31 years old.
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Due to a reporting error, the review originally described War Horse as including Nazis. The play is set during World War I, and does not.
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Due to a reporting error, the review originally described War Horse as including Nazis. The play is set during World War I, and does not.
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Due to a reporting error, the review originally misidentified the songwriting team of My Fair Lady. It was Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe, not Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein.
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Due to a reporting error, this story originally incorrectly stated that Jeff Baxter had gone to St. John’s College High School.
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The article originally contained two reporting errors. It misidentified the Fleetwood Mac album Then Play On. And White grew up outside Charleston, W.Va., not Charlestown.
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This story originally contained two reporting errors. First, it originally incorrectly stated Gio Gonzalez was signed as a free agent. He was acquired in a trade. Also, it misquoted the saying about the old Senators teams; the saying did not refer to a division, but just to the American League.
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This review originally contained two reporting errors: It incorrectly stated that a character was repeatedly called a “young man” while, in fact, he is not referred to as a “young man” in the script. Also, while the piece correctly described some audience members leaving at intermission, it should not have stated that “at least 15 people” walked out. That number was an estimate, not a precise count.
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Due to a reporting error, this story originally reported that Evan Burfield was paid for his work with Startup America by the White House. In fact, Startup America is privately financed, and Burfield works on a volunteer basis.
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Due to a reporting error, this story originally misstated the year Anthony Williams ran for re-election. It was 2002, not 2004.
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Due to a reporting error, the article originally misstated the number of films showing at Silverdocs. There are 114.
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Because of reporting errors, the sections of this story that concern Michael Sindram's building originally contained several inaccuracies. The story wrongly referred to Tenacity Group as the owner of the complex. In fact, it is a condominium building, though it is managed by Cap City Management, a division of Tenacity. The building also does not have an elevator, though the original version of this story stated that the reporter had used one to visit Sindram's third floor apartment. Finally, the management company maintains an office in Takoma Park that the company believes complies with the Office of Human Rights complaint; Sindram disagrees.
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Due to a reporting error, this story misstated the affiliation of the person who accompanied Pepco representatives when they visited Chris Turner's house. He came from the Public Service Commission, not the Office of the People's Counsel. The story has been updated to reflect this correction.
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Due to a reporting error, this story originally misstated the title of JBG Companies Principal Grant Ehat.
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This story originally misspelled the name of Graffiato General Manager Tiffiny Dunn.
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The original version of this article misidentified the director of Studio Theatre's The Walworth Farce. He is Matt Torney, not David Twomey.
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Due to a reporting error, this article originally misidentified the play that The Normal Heart will replace.
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This piece originally misspelled the name of Allbritton Communications.
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Due to a reporting error, this story originally incorrectly identified Chip Akridge. He is the founder of Akridge, but he is not related to company president Matt Klein.
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Due to a reporting error, this article initially attributed a rap lyric to artist Waka Flocka Flame that doesn't show up in his work.

Due to a separate reporting error, it also initially stated that Olivia Fox departed from the Russ Parr Morning Show due to "discrimination." Though Fox stated that she believes pay discrepancies between male and female talent are endemic in the radio industry, and that her departure was connected to a pay discrepancy between her and Parr, she said did not believe her own situation amounted to discrimination.

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Due to reporting errors, this review contained several factual inaccuracies. A character referred to as the Professor is told he's had six drinks, not 15. The Professor works in “a college town near New York,” according to the play's program, but not necessarily in upstate New York. And while the review refers to the Professor’s companion as both a “hooker” and an “exotic dancer,” she is only the latter.
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Due to an editing error, the article misidentified a documentary about graffiti visible from Metrorail's Red Line. The film is called The Red Line D.C. Project.
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Because of an editing error, this story originally wrongly attributed this quote, which came from Suzanne Wells, not Tommy Wells: "We turned in our application in July 2005. Within one week, they got back to us and said yes they would help."
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Due to a reporting error, the article incorrectly described Carleton Ingram as having booked Fort Reno from 1995-2003. He volunteered for the concert series during that entire period, but only booked it from 1996-1999.
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Due to reporting errors, this City Lights pick misidentified the name of the protagonist Andy Glickstein in Ari Roth's play Giant Shadows, and inaccurately said that a montage in the play takes place during a family dinner. It takes place during preparations for an engagement party. Also, due to an editing error, we inaccurately characterized the nature of the protagonist's films. They depict Glickstein's parents' suffering, not his own.
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This story originally misstated the types of items that Ru's family's export/import business handles. It handles promotional items. Also, it originally misidentified Daniel Neman. He is Jonathan Neman's brother.
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Due to a reporting error, last week's City Lights misidentified the year in which the film Air Force One was released. It came out in 1997, not 1996.
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Due to a reporting error, the review misidentified the actress who starred in a 1979 staging of Night and Day at the Kennedy Center. It was Maggie Smith.
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Due to a reporting error, the review misidentified the actress Azania Dungee on second reference.
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Last week's cover story, "Back on Tally's Corner," mistakenly described an Oct. 21, 1991 U.S. News & World Report story on poverty as a cover story when it was an inside feature. The U.S. News story was based on interviews conducted for, not by, University of Chicago sociologist William Julius Wilson. The City Paper story also unfairly implied that the U.S. News author was unaware of the ethnographic methods of researchers like Elliot Liebow.
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An earlier version of this column incorrectly identified Eliot Ness amber lager as Eliot Ness brown ale and has been updated.
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Due to a reporting error, this story originally stated the District had 70 bank robberies in 2008, 81 in 2009, and 79 in 2010. Those numbers actually include bank robberies in both the District and Northern Virginia.
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Due to a reporting error, the article originally misidentified Stripmall Ballads' folk opera The Perfect Pipe Bomb as The Perfect Time Bomb.
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Due to a reporting error, the article originally misidentified the Folger Theatre's production of Henry VIII as a collaboration with the Aquila Theatre Company; it was solely a Folger production. The same article suggested that Druid Theatre Company's Penelope appeared at Studio Theatre in 2010; the production is slated to open this March.
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Due to a reporting error, the article originally misstated the year of a Washington Post review by Chris Richards. It was published in 2009, not 2010.
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The last name of Brightest Young Things founder Svetlana Legetic was originally misspelled in this article.
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This story initially misstated the name of Delaware Republican senatorial candidate Christine O'Donnell.
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Due to a reporting error, the review originally stated that Bell Helicopter performs the music live during Solas Nua's production. A band does, but it's not Bell Helicopter.
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Due to a reporting error, an earlier version of this story misspelled the name of Michael Dola.
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Due to reporting errors in "The Smart-Growth Set," (9/3/2010) the Third Church of Christ, Scientist was misidentified. Additionally Greater Greater Washington founder David Alpert attended his first Living Liberally meeting in Manhattan, not Brooklyn, as was originally reported.
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Because of a reporting error, this story incorrectly identified the college attended by former All-Met basketball player Dominic Pressley. He went on to play for Boston College. The Web version of this story has been updated to reflect the changes.
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Because of a reporting error, last week's cover story misstated the first name of Top Chef contestant Angelo Sosa. The Web version of this story has been updated to reflect the changes.
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Due to a reporting error, last week's cover story failed to mention that the "Office of Bruce Bereano" has contributed $2,000 to D.C. Council Chairman Vincent Gray's mayoral campaign. Bruce Bereano, a Gray family friend and one of Maryland's top lobbyists, has not given an individual donation to Gray's campaign, according to campaign finance documents current as of the June 10 reporting deadline. The story also reported that a city contractor had built a fence at Gray's property. Though other work at the house had been done —at market rate—by a city contractor, the fence was built by a separate firm. The Web version of this story has been updated to reflect the changes.
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In an earlier version of this article, the "panicked best friend" in Public Enemy was misidentified as David Paglin. In fact, the part was played by Daniel Kenner.
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Due to an error by film critic Tricia Olszewski, an earlier version of this article stated that Terribly Happy had been nominated for Best Foreign Language Film. The movie was Denmark's official submission to the Academy, but it was not nominated.
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Due to an error by columnist Mike DeBonis, this column originally referred to Candi Peterson as a "special-ed aide." Peterson is a social worker, not an aide.
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Due to an error by reporter Mike DeBonis, this column misreported that Intralot won the city lottery contract by a single point. In fact, Intralot won by 11 points; had the competing GTECH group received full small-business certification from the city, worth 12 points, it would have won by one point.
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Reporter Mike DeBonis mistakenly reported that Yellow Cab is owned by Andy Schaeffer. In fact, Vaughn G. Williams owns Yellow; Schaffer owns an insurance company used by most of its drivers.
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Columnist Mike DeBonis incorrectly referred to "six additional Bushies" now working at the Office of State Superintendent of Education. As noted elsewhere in the text, two of the six former U.S. Department of Education workers—Cathie Carothers and Patrick Rooney—served as career federal employees, not as Bush administration political appointees.
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In this column, John Stokes, spokesperson for the D.C. Department of Parks and Recreation, told staff writer Dave McKenna that the wood fiber used at Pierce Park and Kalorama Park came from Zeager Bros. Inc. of Middletown, Pa. Zeager Bros. officials protested that assertion to the city. Stokes now says the wood fiber at the Pierce and Kalorama playgrounds was manufactured by Eastern Shore Wood Forest Products in Salisbury, Md.
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An earlier version of this piece referred to Wilco as a septet. The band is a sextet.
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Due to an error by columnist Mike DeBonis, this column originally reported that Alex Padro was the Shaw advisory neighborhood commission's longest-serving member. In fact, fellow member Doris Brooks had served for at least a decade prior to Padro's 2000 election.
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Due to an error by the author, this article originally indicated that Ward 1 Councilmember Jim Graham had chaired the economic development committee during council term 16. In fact, he had chaired the Committee on Consumer and Regulatory Affairs.
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This article, due to an error by the author, originally reported that Keith Ricca was the only one of his brothers to have married. In fact, Kevin Ricca is the only brother who has married, and the final quote should have been attributed to him.
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Due to an error by Rachel Kaufman, last week's Young & Hungry column mentioned a free sandwich received by Clarence Webb "66 years ago," when Webb was a rookie in the Alexandria Police Department. Webb, as reported, is 74 and was not 8 years old when he joined the police department; the sandwich in question was received 52 years ago.
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Due to an error by columnist Mike DeBonis, this article originally misstated the election slate that D.C. Democratic State Committee chair Anita Bonds will appear on. She is on the "Obama for Change" slate, not the "Obama for D.C." slate.
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Columnist Mike DeBonis misreported comments by mayoral spokesperson Dena Iverson that the council submitted no formal request for Deputy Mayor for Education Victor Reinoso's presence at a July 11 hearing. In fact, council staff had sent formal requests, and Iverson's comments as reported were an initial response to DeBonis' inquiry; Iverson shortly afterward revised her statement to say that the "standard practice is to send those who are responsible for the hearing subject matter on a day to day basis." Due to notetaking errors, DeBonis mistakenly reported the initial response.
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Due to an error by columnist Dave McKenna, the original article mistakenly referred to the Emmy Awards as a "debacle." The "debacle" was actually this year's Golden Globe Awards, also owned by Dan Snyder.
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Due to a reporting error by columnist Mike DeBonis, this article originally attributed the quote, “In this town, if you don’t support gay marriage, you don’t deserve to be on the council,” to Rick Rosendall. It was actually said by Bob Summersgill.
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Due to an error by columnist Mike DeBonis, this article misstated the residency of mayoral chief of staff Tene Dolphin. She lives in Ward 5, not Ward 8.
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Due to an error by reporter Mike DeBonis, the article originally gave the incorrect name for a nonprofit organization. The group is called the 21st Century School Fund, not the 21st Century Schools Project.
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The article originally gave an incorrect name for the outfit that contracted to study the Office of Tax and Revenue's operations. It is called the Wendell Group, not the Window Group.
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This article originally misidentified Kim LeDee as Kim DeLee.
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This article originally stated the wrong date for an upcoming meeting of the Board for the Condemnation of Insanitary Properties. The meeting will take place on Oct. 24, not the 26th.

To notify us of a factual error or any other matter that you believe should be corrected, please contact the editor, Mike Madden:

mmadden@washingtoncitypaper.com

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