Young and Hungry

Furstenberg Is Forced to Expand Beyond Street Foods

DSCN1594_optMark Furstenberg's vision for his new G Street Food was simple: He wanted to bring some of the world's greatest street foods to a city that has some of the worst. It's too bad that Washingtonians don't seem to appreciate them. Or at least don't seem to appreciate them as much as Furstenberg and his partners had hoped.

The master baker says that revenues at G Street Food, in the first few weeks of operation, are down at least 40 percent from projections.  It's enough to cause concern for the owners of the place, the Choi family, who "expected it to do well from the beginning," Furstenberg tells Y&H.

Furstenberg doesn't quite know how to explain the slow start for G Street Food. He takes part of the blame. He thinks he opened with too few items on the menu and the ones he did offer were not familiar enough to the professional set who crowd these downtown sidewalks looking for lunch options. He has literally seen people walk into G Street, look at the menu, and walk right out.

So he has done what he really didn't want to do: He's expanded the menu beyond street foods. Along with his banh mi and socca and merguez sausage, Furstenberg now sells a muffuletta, sloppy Joe, meatball sub, and even an egg salad sandwich.

Furstenberg's not selling anything that he's "embarrassed about," he says. "But it's not what I intended to do. Hopefully I will one day get back to street food."

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