Young and Hungry

Scenes from the Capital Food Fight: The Final Word

This year's Capital Food Fight pulled in roughly $250,000, says Michael F. Curtin Jr., CEO of D.C. Central Kitchen, roughly half of which came from sponsorships. Not bad for a single event in a down economy. I e-mailed Curtin and asked how he felt the Fight compared to previous years.

His response will be the last word (well, for today) on this year's event:

I'd have to say this was the best event yet. The feel in the room was spectacular and everyone I talked to couldn't have been more effusive about the night. What always gives me great pleasure is to hear the restaurant folks talk about how they enjoyed the event. Having been in the biz for many years and having done many of these events, it is very important to me that they not only enjoy, but feel their investment, time and money, is worth it. Recognizing that they get asked to do sooo many of these kinds of things, a couple of years ago, I started offering stipends to the restaurants to off set some of their foods costs. Even though most of the restaurants donate this back to the Kitchen, I think it makes a difference and sets us apart from a lot of the other organizations hosting these kind of events.

As I said last night, we couldn't do what we do without the many hundred partners we have in the community. There is no doubt that the bedrock of those partnerships is the chef/hospitality community.

I also wanted to say that the chefs all came with their A games. Having been to and participated in hundreds of "tasting" events, I know they can get stale. That simply wasn't the case last night as the chefs pulled out the best china and silver and rocked the house with their art.