Young and Hungry

Get Your Fill of Arepas and Kolaches This Weekend

arepa1It’s a good time for stuffed dough. Among the handheld foods having their moment in D.C.: arepas—grilled corn patties filled with meats, cheeses, and more—and kolaches, pillowy Czech pastries with sweet or savory fillings that are particularly beloved in Texas. Two new “residencies” showcase these treats. Here’s where to stuff yourself on stuffed stuff.

Arepa Zone at Union Market
After winning a culinary entrepreneur competition called Launch Pad, the Venezuelan food truck gets to take over the former Ris stall in Union Market. Arepa Zone will serve more than a dozen arepas as well as quesadilla-like sweet corn crepes called cachapas and gourmet cheese sticks called tequeños.

Read more Get Your Fill of Arepas and Kolaches This Weekend

SKWR Kabobline Opens Near Franklin Square Today

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The latest fast-casual build-your-own-meal restaurant aims to make kabob a little bit more hip. SKWR, which opens Friday at 14th and K streets NW, comes from cousins and George Mason University grads Tamim Shoja and Masoud Shoja, who grew up working in their families' restaurants, Dulles Kabob and Reston Kabob. Along with their longtime friend Hemad Khwaja, they're looking to offer an updated take on their native Afghan fare.  Read more SKWR Kabobline Opens Near Franklin Square Today

Last Night’s Leftovers

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5 of the best crab cakes in D.C. [Washingtonian]

5 daytrips from D.C. that take 2 hours or less by car, train, or bus. [Express]

8 binge-worthy blowout feasts in D.C. [Zagat]

10 things to see, eat, drink, and do before summer ends [Post]

12 best bars and restaurants in Charlottesville [Thrillist]

17 standout BLT sandwiches [Eater]

Photo via Shutterstock

The ’Wiching Hour: Walter’s Pulled Pork Sammy

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The Sandwich: Pulled Pork Sammy

Where: Walter’s, 3632 Georgia Ave. NW

Price: $9

Bread: Toasted sandwich roll

Stuffings: Pulled pork, tomato, red onion, garlic aioli

Thickness: 4 inches

Pros: Despite this Park View bar’s tiny kitchen—which precludes a huge variety of food offerings—this simple sandwich is executed quite well. The roll, which looks bland, comes out buttery and crisp, and the garlic aioli has a pleasant saltiness. With the pork piled at least two inches high on the bun, this sandwich won’t leave you hungry.

Read more The ’Wiching Hour: Walter’s Pulled Pork Sammy

Dancing Goats Coffee Bar Coming to Georgetown

batdorfOlympia, Wash.-based Batdorf & Bronson Coffee Roasters is slated to open the first D.C. location of its Dancing Goats Coffee Bar in Georgetown later this year. The coffee house will move into the former Neyla space at 3206 N St. NW in partnership with a new retailer. (Business Development Director Mike Ferguson is awaiting the OK to announce who that retailer is.)

Batdorf & Bronson, which has been around for nearly 30 years, currently has seven coffee shops in Washington state and Georgia. The D.C. location will be the first without a roaster in the same city, but Ferguson says the beans will still be two days out of the roaster, "so the coffee will be stunningly fresh."

"We tend to focus on what we call relationship coffee," Ferguson says. "Almost all of our coffees, our coffee buyer has been to the farm and has met the farmers. We have coffees that we've been buying from the same farmer for 15, almost 20 years, so we literally sit down at their kitchen table. We watch their kids grow up." Read more Dancing Goats Coffee Bar Coming to Georgetown

Underserved: The Maverick & Gueze at Jack Rose Dining Saloon

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Underserved is a recurring Y&H feature highlighting the best cocktails you're not ordering.

What: The Maverick & Gueze with Beefeater 224, tamarind red bush syrup, pimento bitters, orange bitters, and sour beer

Where: Jack Rose Dining Saloon, 2007 18th St. NW

Price: $13

What You Should Be Drinking

The Maverick & Gueze asks Jack Rose Dining Saloon patrons to avert their eyes from the restaurant’s library of whiskey and try a gin-based beer-tail instead. Top Gun fans should find this feat a little easier thanks to the clever reference that swaps Goose for Gueze—the name of the sour beer from Belgium that adds spunk to the summery cocktail. To make the drink, Beverage Director Trevor Frye employs a technique he learned from Jim Meehan, author of The PDT Cocktail Book. Frye pours beer directly into the shaker and gently stirs, allowing the alcohol from the gin to break down the carbonation enough for it to be safe to shake sans explosion. “By shaking it together, you’re guaranteeing you’re not just getting beer, beer, beer, cocktail,” Frye says. “Shaking it reinvigorates the carbonation so the drink floods your palate with flavor.”

Read more Underserved: The Maverick & Gueze at Jack Rose Dining Saloon

Last Night’s Leftovers: Dog Days Edition

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Where to enjoy happy hour with your dog [BYT]

The most anticipated fall restaurant openings [Eater]

Columbia Heights and Park View restaurants hit by burglaries. [Borderstan]

&pizza on U Street NW closes for quick renovation. [PoPville]

Why do so many hot new restaurants have names that sound the same? [Washingtonian]

Prequel welcomes more restaurant pop-ups. [Post]

Photo of the “Hungry Dawg” steak at Art and Soul by Darrow Montgomery

D.C.’s Newest Distillery, Jos. A. Magnus & Co., Revives a Century-Old Bourbon

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Jimmy Turner found the bottle in crumpled brown packaging on the top shelf of a closet, behind some other items. It was 2007, his mother had just passed away, and he was cleaning out his parents’ St. Louis home. Turner already knew that his great-grandfather, Joseph A. Magnus, was a distiller in pre-Prohibition days, but inside this long-forgotten bottle was hard evidence: a 100-plus-year-old bourbon that had been passed down through family members over generations.

The discovery set Turner off on a path to learn more about his great-grandfather. It turned out Magnus, who had lived and worked in Cincinnati, was quite successful in his day as a distiller, blender, and rectifier (someone who acquires spirits and then puts their own mark on them). Magnus produced bourbon, rye whiskey, gin, and rum, and had at least 20 brands to his name, the most famous of which was known as Murray Hill Club.

Over the next several years, Turner began collecting empty antique Magnus liquor bottles and reaching out to relatives for information. Cousins in Cincinnati surprised him with another century-old bottle of bourbon by Magnus, and Turner assembled a group of whiskey experts to help him understand what he had on his hands. The journey culminated last week with the opening of Jos. A. Magnus & Co. in Ivy City, a bourbon and gin distillery that wants to revive the legacy of the original Magnus brand. Read more D.C.’s Newest Distillery, Jos. A. Magnus & Co., Revives a Century-Old Bourbon

Due South Brings Nashville Hot Chicken and St. Louis-Style Ribs to Navy Yard

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Navy Yard's Osteria Morini, Ice Cream Jubilee, and Agua 301 have a new neighbor called Due South. The Southern restaurant opened on Aug. 14 with a limited menu for dinner only. The food offerings will double or triple in size and the hours will expand to lunch beginning on Sept. 8 with the grand opening.

Due South comes from Georgetown Events, headed by restaurateur Bo Blair, which is also behind BayouJetties, Surfside, and the Fairgrounds at Nats Park. Chef and partner Rusty Holman, who also oversees the kitchen at Bayou, hails from South Carolina, and the restaurant was designed around his style of cooking. Read more Due South Brings Nashville Hot Chicken and St. Louis-Style Ribs to Navy Yard

Last Night’s Leftovers: Chef’s Favorite Dives Edition

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10 D.C.-area chefs name their favorite dive bars. [Thrillist]

Critic Tom Sietsema visits New Orleans. [Post]

Where to find half-priced wine nights around D.C. [Washingtonian]

Five ice cream sandwiches to try before summer ends [Eater]

10 reasons to drive to Annapolis [Zagat]

Central American cooking is thriving on 14th Street NW. [DCist]

Photo by Darrow Montgomery

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