The Sexist

Why Don’t We Accept Victim-Blaming From Rapists?

Last month, convicted rapist Daniel Katsnelson administered some advice to the two York University students he raped in 2007. After pleading guilty to entering a campus residence, prowling for open doors, and then raping two students, Katsnelson told his parole officer that he hopes the girls learned something from all this:

Katsnelson indicated he hoped his victims could take something “positive” away from the experience of being sexually assaulted. “When asked what that might be, he suggested that maybe she will now know to keep her doors locked,” the pre-sentence report stated.

Anti-rape blogger Cara Kulwicki wasn't surprised by Katsnelson's comments; she encounters disgusting sentiments like that one every single day. But she was surprised to learn that mainstream media outlets reacted with disgust to the "lock your doors" lesson. After all, when victim-blaming tips are handed down by anyone other than a convicted rapist, nobody seems to bat an eye. Kulwicki writes:

And far more than I’m surprised by his comments, I’m surprised by the fact that the media seems to be almost as appalled as I am. The statement isn’t just printed in the article, it’s featured in quite a few headlines. His words are referred to as “startling” and the “revulsion” of listeners is carefully noted. And while relieved that for once publications aren’t just parroting back the victim-blaming excuses and framing of a rapist and his attorney, I also simply cannot help but ask myself: where the hell are they the rest of the time?

Where is the shock and outrage when it’s argued that a victim shouldn’t have gotten into a car or entered a building with her assailant? Where is the outrage when it’s argued that if women didn’t get themselves so drunk, rapists wouldn’t rape them? Where is the outrage when it’s essentially stated that sex workers can’t be raped? Why is it not a cause of shock and source of headlines when a sexual assault is explained away as verifying the genitals of a person the assailant suspected was trans? Where are the expressions of horror when those who failed to stop the reported and ongoing rape of a woman with a mental illness declare themselves to have not been negligent? Where are the editors shaking their fists when a defense attorney goes out of his way to note that an alleged victim was a drug user? Where is the anti-rape media perspective when the assault of a child by an adult is being referred to as “sex”? Where are they? Because nine times out of ten, they’re turning the other way.

As far as victim-blaming sentiments are concerned, Katsnelson's comments were far from extreme. Last fall, a series of sexual assaults were reported inside a freshman dorm at the George Washington University. In October of last year, a University of Maryland student entered the residence early in the morning, prowled for open doors, and then sexually assaulted several women, placing his hands down their pants and forcibly kissing them. In response to the attacks, G.W. student newspaper the Hatchet—the leading media source on campus—performed an act of victim-blaming nearly identical to Katsnelson's. The assaults, the paper's editors wrote, served as a “valuable reminder of the necessity for students to lock their doors at all times and to take responsibility for guests you bring into residence halls.”

When a rapist blames his victims, we're appalled. When we do it, we're just being "realistic," "concerned," "protective," "responsible." Why are we outraged when rapists blame their victims, but not when we blame them? Because while it's unseemly to blatantly support the sorry excuses of a convicted rapist, we're still invested in supporting a culture of victim-blaming that shifts the responsibility of eliminating rape away from society as a whole, and onto individual victims. When Katsnelson tells his victims to "lock their doors," he's shifting the responsibility for the rape off of the rapist. When the G.W. community tells victims to do the same thing, it similarly excuses the campus of taking any meaningful action against sexual assault.

But when rapists start using the same victim-blaming arguments we do, it makes it a lot harder for us to keep up the narrative of blame without being identified as rape apologists. One solution to this problem is to tell those rapists to shut up, because it's making us look bad. So we call out a rapist for revealing himself to be—gee, who would have thought!—a rape apologist, and we draw a line in the sand that helps to protect our own right to victim-blame. We use the same tactic to excuse our own casual homophobia and racism. Our homophobic slurs and racist jokes are just "ironic" and "anti-PC" and "social commentary," but when a gay basher or a white supremacist uses the same words, well, that's just socially unacceptable. The reason we are allowed to use these words, we tell ourselves, is because we are not truly homophobes, or racists, or rape apologists.

In other words, the only people who are allowed to blame rape victims are people who don't really, truly believe in their heart of hearts that the victim is at fault. This clever little set-up helps keep victim-blaming alive while preventing any victim-blamer from actually being identified as a bad person. It's also inspired the use of the very popular construction, "I'm not blaming the victim, but [enter victim-blaming sentiment here]."

In the end, the only people who are allowed to use the language of rapists are the millions of people in this country who haven't actually been convicted of the crime. How is this not a rape culture again?

  • christellar

    "In other words, the only people who are allowed to blame rape victims are people who don’t really, truly believe in their heart of hearts that the victim is at fault."

    I dont see how "rape" would ever be the fault of the victim. This is quite twisted.

    I do however--believe that some women falsely accuse men--and in that case its NOT RAPE AT ALL.

    Perhaps the wording of "victim" is the wrong choice here.
    Disrespectful to those who are a) falsely accused and b) have been raped before

    IMHO

  • Harry Finkbein

    It isn't a rape culture because rape is so rare. The average person goes about their lives and never experiences rape. However, there is a definite interest to feminists in having an official 'rape culture'. Shaming all men, everywhere, and at all times is good news for women. Not a bad way to win a gender war, and let's be clear, it is a war. You know it and I know it.

    "valuable reminder of the necessity for students to lock their doors at all times and to take responsibility for guests you bring into residence halls.”

    What are they supposed to say? Got any better ideas? A package of cigarettes comes with a warning: 'smoking can kill you.' Does that mean we live in a smoke culture? How so? Please explain.

    If you don't want to get raped, then be smart. Lock your doors and don't dress like a hooker. Don't get shitfaced at a house party and act like a cock tease. Then you won't get raped. If you don't want lung cancer -don't smoke!

    "valuable reminder of the necessity for students to lock their doors at all times and to take responsibility for guests you bring into residence halls.”

  • rebekah manning

    @Hary, Go away you fucking troll.

  • jules

    @ Harry: A few points.

    1. actually, rape isn't rare at all. In fact, one in six women will be raped or otherwise sexually assaulted in their lifetime.

    2. As feminists, we're not interested in shaming men. We are interested in starting a dialogue with men about what exactly IS rape, and how/why it happens.

    3. (I'm sure I won't be the only person offering a response) What a woman is wearing (dressing like a "hooker") is 1. Incredibly subjective: one person's hooker is another's nun and 2. NEVER a justification for sexual assault.

    As food for thought: Are there things a men can wear to a party that would earn him a "deserved raping"? Right. Think about that.

  • rebekah manning

    oh and to amanda, why do you continue to allow the trolls and the victim blamers to post their nasty hate messages up? Especially when you are aware that some of us are indeed rape victims and would appreciate being able to read your articles without having to deal with these people. Please kick them off of here and block them

  • squirrely girl

    Are you serious Harry or just mentally challenged?

    "If you don’t want to get raped, then be smart. Lock your doors and don’t dress like a hooker. Don’t get shitfaced at a house party and act like a cock tease. Then you won’t get raped. If you don’t want lung cancer -don’t smoke!"

    Did you just completely miss the concepts of second hand smoke and all of the rapes that occur when the woman is NOT dressed "like a hooker" or "shitfaced at a house party?"

    Or do you just like apologizing for rapists and don't care about reality? Ooops. My bad.

  • ElDiablo666

    There's a difference between recommending safe strategies for women and victim-blaming. People are in control of their actions and should be held to account but that doesn't mean that even though we demand safety that we ought to blind ourselves to the realities of the world.

    Suggesting that women walk in groups after a long study session late at night is not blaming them for what might happen if they don't. Locking a dorm room is a strategy for safety, good or bad. To me this is very different than saying don't wear skimpy clothes or get wasted.

  • http://www.garlandgrey.com Garland Grey

    @Harry: There is no possible way a woman could dress that would excuse rape. Please go away and never talk to another woman again.

  • Em

    Garland: my guess is that women probably won't talk to him already.

  • http://bikegroggery.blogspot.com groggette

    What are you talking about Garland? I know I was totally asking for it that one time in the middle of the day when I was sober and in full cycling kit (complete with ridiculous helmet hair) when a man tried to rape me. And likewise with his previous victim who was wearing her required uniform for the fast food place she worked at, that slut.

    @Em, and they're total bitches for it too.

    /snark to keep from slamming my head into a wall

  • https://scatteredfemthoughts.blogspot.com Ami

    "One solution to this problem is to tell those rapists to shut up, because it’s making us look bad."

    I definitely see this as a factor. People don't want to be associated with rapists, so they condemn that person for saying what they might have also said.

    People also don't want to be associated with rape victims, either, which is why they victim blame in the first place. I remember in my social psych class as an undergrad we learned that people often blame the victim because they are subconsciously trying to still their own fears that the rape (or murder or mugging or what-have-you) want not a random event.

    If it's a random event, then it's something that could happen to them, and that's threatening. But if it's something about *that* person that "caused" the event, then well, that's not so scary.

    I'm not justifying rape apologists or victim blamers. I'm simply showing one theory about why it is so disturbingly popular. However, this theory only works if you're someone who victim blames and then when someone else says "Hey, asshole. You just blamed the victim" you decide to STFU and not do it again.

  • Sarah

    Fear is definitely a huge factor in victim-blaming, particularly among women. The thought of being raped is horrifying -- so you try to pick out an aspect of the victim's behavior that you would NEVER do, or an aspect of the victim's appearance that's unlike you. Then, you can believe that everything's under control. You won't experience sexual violence because you are responsible, self-assured, safety-conscious, always sober, whatever. I wish these people would see that their coping mechanism for dealing with rape culture is hurting everyone! Sadly this doesn't just extend to harshly judging victims' behavior, it's yet another reason why many victims aren't believed in the first place.

  • Dawn.

    christellar - False accusations are actually rare. According to the FBI, only 8% of reported rapes turn out to be false accusations. That statistic can be found easily through Google. It's official record. So why did you bring false accusations up? It exaggerates them into An Issue, which it's not, and draws attention away from the subject at hand: victim-blaming in the media and by extension, our culture.

    I don't like the term victim either, but NOT because of "false accusations." I personally prefer the term survivor.

  • Marty

    I feel like I've seen this sort of thing before, but does anyone have a source for statistics to combat victim-blaming myths? Like about victim appearance/behavior? I want to be able to cite sources.

  • Dawn.

    Sarah - excellent point. I 100% agree. I used to engage in victim blaming as a coping mechanism; even after I experienced two attempted rapes (at ages 17 and 18, respectively). I kept it up until I fully realized how much harm I was causing by even internally perpetuating rape culture. On the outside, I would always say "oh it's never her/his fault," but on the inside I would run through the usual checklist to distinguish myself from the survivor. I realized that it was harmful because I began to see it as internalized misogyny and classism. This was during the same time that I was dealing with internalized racism within myself and my community at the time, so that helped me see what I was doing in regards to victim-blaming.

  • Jack

    8 years and be eligible for parole in 3. He should be locked up for at least 30 with no parole if not more. I have seen similar cases in the States get the rapists more than 50.

    He not only said he hoped his victims "learned to lock their doors" but that he hoped that they would take something positive away from this and that he had. He also claimed he wasn't a violent person.

    This violent narcissist will be on the street before we know it, using another name (which he did while working during his bail) and be another example of the failure of the Canadian soft-serve justice system that puts its women and children at risk of violence.

  • Em

    Interesting reading is a book called "Virgin or Vamp", about how media perpetuates a rape culture by how they cover rape victims, and rape mythology our culture believes. I had to read it in college, and I personally feel like the first chapter should be required reading for all college students...though warning to those who have experienced sexual assault, this would definitely be a "trigger" book.

    And Dawn, amen to the victim/survivor dichotomy. As an abuse survivor, I'm really sensitive about people calling me a "victim" sometimes, and the word survivor kind of takes your own identity back.

  • Laura Burton

    @ Marty, there are a few free articles I really like that cite a lot of sources about these myths:

    Barriers to Credibility: Understanding and Countering Rape Myths -
    http://www.ng.mil/jointstaff/j1/sapr/files/Barriers_to_Credibility.pdf

    False Reports: Moving Beyond the Issue to Successfully Investigate and Prosecute Non-Stranger Sexual Assault -
    http://www.ndaa.org/publications/newsletters/the_voice_vol_3_no_1_2009.pdf

  • TT

    Regarding Dawn's first comment:

    Whoa whoa whoa... not to detract from the issue at hand, but if 8% of reported rapes are false accusations, how is that not an issue? That seems like a pretty significant figure - almost 1 in 10. Would you say gay rights are not important because only 10% of the population is gay? Would you say that rape prevention is unnecessary because only 15% of women experience rape in their lifetime?

    This is in no way a defense of rape apologia or victim-blaming, or an exagerated rant on how bad men have it. But to say that 8% of accused rapists are innocent, and that this is a total non-issue, is bullshit. I would have to imagine getting falsely accused of rape is a majorly traumatizing, stigmatizing experience that would follow you around the rest of your life.

  • http://twitter.com/scaryjoann scary joann

    Wait wait wait. So instead of focusing on the victims, we should focus on the false accusations. Instead of trying to stop the constant stereotyping of the 'rapeable woman' we should focus on the eight percent. Not the ninety-two percent, the eight. Naturally. Makes perfect sense.
    So if ten people you knew had been raped, you would focus on the one who had lied about it to judge the other nine by.

    It's not that that eight percent isn't an issue asshat, it's that it is a MUCH smaller issue than it is made out to be. In most rape cases (such as my boyfriends mom) when she did pluck up enough courage to tell her domineering father that his friend had raped her, he and her brother instead called her a liar. And continued to let him be around her regularly.
    Because of that tiny 8%, the other 92% gets blamed for their own rape.

    Oh, and what would be worse? Getting raped and then having everyone call you a liar and stigmatize you, or being falsely accused of rape?
    I know which one I would rather survive.

  • Jack

    Are 8% false accusations or is it a combination of false accusations and those that lack enough evidence to convict? A lack of enough evidence is not an absolute confirmation of innocence, just that there is not enough to prove the crime beyond a reasonable doubt. Throw in that a substantial number, possibly a majority of rapes go unreported and the misleading 8% figure is even less substantial than you are suggesting.

    The more disturbing issue is the sheer number of women who are assaulted. The FBI figures state that at least one in five will be raped or have it attempted by the time they graduate college alone.

    Yes, falsely accusing someone of rape is a horribly vicious and unforgivably criminal thing to do but it is not as prevalent as some would believe. What a rape victim is put through during an investigation as well as the all too common "blame the victim" mentality are strong deterrents to reporting being raped, genuine or not.

  • http://toysoldier.wordpress.com Toysoldier

    And while relieved that for once publications aren’t just parroting back the victim-blaming excuses and framing of a rapist and his attorney, I also simply cannot help but ask myself: where the hell are they the rest of the time?

    I read articles about sexual violence every day. It is not common for media outlets to victim-blame, at least not female victims. When it does occur, it is a matter of the language used, not a direct parroting of the accused or the accused's attorney. I think Cara should be careful not to misconstrue news outlets reporting both sides of the story as parroting the accused's position.

    The assaults, the paper’s editors wrote, served as a “valuable reminder of the necessity for students to lock their doors at all times and to take responsibility for guests you bring into residence halls.”

    Giving advice in order to help prevent future assaults is not victim-blaming. This argument occurs here and on other feminist blogs frequently, and seem to pretend that but for "rape culture" women would be safe. Unfortunately, all humans, male and female, are not trustworthy. It has little to do with conspiracy theories about "teh evil menz," and has a lot to do with how some people behave. If locking your door might prevent someone from assaulting you, it is fair for someone to suggest that you should lock your door.

    That said, I agree that it is not a polite thing to say to a victim.

    Our homophobic slurs and racist jokes are just “ironic” and “anti-PC” and “social commentary,” but when a gay basher or a white supremacist uses the same words, well, that’s just socially unacceptable. The reason we are allowed to use these words, we tell ourselves, is because we are not truly homophobes, or racists, or rape apologists.

    Obviously no one thinks of themselves as bigoted or biased, in the same way you do not think of yourself as sexist for gendering rapists as only male. However, the comparison with slurs and jokes does not work because people who make victim-blaming statements do not think they are being ironic, anti-PC, or making social commentary. Most of those people actually believe what they state. They do not put themselves in the same light as rapists because those people do not think they said anything wrong. It is no different than when some man claims date rape never occurs or when feminists like Cara claim that discussing male victims' experiences silence and victim-blames female victims.

    That is not "rape culture," but the common human tendency to believe that one's views are inherently fair and balanced, i.e. that you are acting in good faith.

  • NbyNW

    @TT

    The rate of false rape accusations has not been well studied. The 8% is an FBI number from 1996. Other studies have put the rate at 2% of REPORTED rapes. (Remembering always that only 16% of rapes are ever reported and an even smaller number are ever convicted)

    A rate of false accusations between 2-8% sounds like it is in the range of false accusations for other crimes.

    As very few accused rapists are ever convicted, I would hazard the guess that there are far more innocent people in prisons falsely convicted of murder, assault, drug possession, burglary, mugging, tax fraud, etc than rape.

    Of course every innocent person serving time behind bars for a crime they did not commit is an outrage. To proactively address this issue, check out groups like the Innocence Project.

    But it is only trolls who try to derail conversations about the 200,000 women who are raped each year in the United States to focus on the few dozen who may be wrongfully convicted. The subject of this post is rape culture and victim-blaming.

  • TT

    Yes, I would imagine getting raped is a more traumatizing and stigmatizing experience than being falsely accused of rape. But they can both be terrible things. It doesn't have to be an either/or propisition.

    Likewise, I never suggested we should focus on false accusations instead of the victims of rape. We can focus on both. Once again, it doesn't have to be an either/or proposition.

    All I said was that I took umbrage with someone citing an 8% false accusation statistic, then saying that false rape accusations were a non-issue.

    I thought my comment was very level-headed, reasonable, and phrased in a way to indicate that I did not wish to minimalize the importance of the victim-blaming discussion. So thanks for going out of your way to insult me in your response. A piece of advice: don't use the word "asshat." It makes you sound like a complete idiot, which I'm guessing, based on your coherent writing and the fact that you read this blog, that you are not.

  • TT

    In the meantime, I don't want to derail the conversation. I found Dawn's original comment offensive based on the statistic that she herself supplied, and I commented on it. Maybe NbyNW's statistics are more accurate. Carry on with the original conversation.

  • bellacoker

    The problem I have with the "How Not to Get Raped" advice given to women is that it does not actually do anything to prevent rape. While locking my door, or whatever, might prevent me from getting raped, that rapist is going to keep checking doors until he finds one that is open. Not getting shitty drunk at a frat party might keep me from getting raped, but that rapist will just find another victim.

    In order to be successful, this advice must be practiced perfectly by every potential rape victim all the time, and any failure which leads to a rape will automatically be seen as the rape victims fault.

    How is it reasonable to expect that from potential rape victims, but somehow not reasonable to expect people not to rape? The entire basis is absurd.

  • Harry Finkbein

    Since the sexual revolution there has been an observable decline in marriage and fertility. Perhaps we have 'rape culture' because we do not have a 'marriage culture'. If women want to see rape decline, perhaps they should stop chasing after alpha males and start fucking beta males.

    Do not separate rape from sex, power, and envy. Therein lies the mistake. Also, heed the words of Spengler's Universal Law of Gender Parity: In every age and in every culture, the men and women have deserved each other.

    Women chase alpha males. They are willing to dress up like sluts and go to house parties, and well to be frank, cock-tease. Women love to cock-tease. You should not be surprised when a teased cock violates you. In this instance, the woman deserved it. Now, I don't think children or the weak or the elderly ever deserve to be raped. But a young woman dressed like a whore? Yep, she was asking for it. Sorry ladies, freedom ain't free. You can't have it both ways.

  • bellacoker

    @Harry:

    If you are saying that women can avoid rape by having sex with people we don't want to have sex with? I think you are missing the point.

    Also, and I know that this is going to be difficult for you to grasp, most of the time the things that women do have absolutely nothing to do with cock.

  • Artsynomad

    @bellacoker - Locking your door and not drinking at parties doesn't stop date rape, either. Boyfriends, husbands, and platonic friends are more likely than strangers to rape a woman and that's likely to happen in the woman's house or the house of her assailant. Locking your door just doesn't help when the rapist is a person who had previously earned your trust.

  • bellacoker

    @Artsynomad:

    Yes, of course. That is much more likely and not even covered in the "prevention" materials.

  • Jack

    The women deserved it Harry? Your misogyny is palpable. A man with no self control is no man and neither are you.

  • rebekah manning

    AMANDA HOW MANY TIMES DO I HAVE TO SAY IT? BLOCK THE RAPE APOLOGIZING MISOGYNISTS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • Melissa

    Harry, I understand that it must suck that you can't get a date. However, you might want to consider that the reason doesn't have anything to do with your being a "beta" male (which, I'm assuming is related to not fitting a certain beauty standard for men and/or not making much money, which I can guarantee DO NOT MATTER to most women), but is actually because you're kind of an asshole.

  • Jack

    Kind of an A**Hole? You are being far too generous, Melissa.

  • Harry Finkbein

    'Rape Culture' is part of a larger war against males. Sex, marriage, divorce and rape have been redefined by feminists to fit their larger ideology, which is to destroy the family. Most rape is perpetrated by an intimate partner. However, until very recently, sex was considered a woman's duty to give to her partner. Under our current laws sex is a weapon wielded by feminists to destroy men and boys. Boys growing up today *automatically* consider themselves rapists, and they consider their sexuality deviant and shameful.

    If women and feminists continue to legislate misandrist laws to demonize men, then the gender war will continue. Already, divorce laws are established to allow for easy-peasy divorce, theft of a man's assets after divorce, and so on and so forth. If eye contact becomes a violation of a woman's privacy, the feminist agenda will be complete.

    The truth is hard to swallow, Rebecca, but IF YOU HAVE A SON OR A BROTHER YOU MIGHT WANT TO RE-THINK YOUR BEHAVIOR! (see- I can yell, too).

    Start fucking your husbands more, ladies. And drop the feminism. And that will be the end of rape.

  • Melissa

    I could be wrong, but I think he's trying to be funny. Maybe I just find that easier to accept than the idea that he actually believes what he's saying.

    Harry, it's really not funny. Go somewhere else.

  • Jack

    If Harry isn't just trying to intentionally irritate people I'd say he's a hate addict. he likes to yaps off about what he considers "Family Values" then says rape can be justified. His comments about what some girls wear being a cause for rape is something you'd expect from a member of the Taliban. If he is deriving his values from Christianity he clearly missed the "Do unto others . . ./love your neighbor as yourselves" part.

    His comments like "Start f*****g your husbands more, ladies. And drop the feminism. And that will be the end of rape." is so out of touch he is either just trying to get a rise out of people or he is seriously deluded. I hope it is the first because the latter would mean he is so deranged that he is probably a danger to others.

    Either way he is pathetic beyond belief.

  • bellacoker

    I think Harry is just very perturbed that he missed out on the 1860's. Have you considered Civil War re-enactment?

  • Eo

    We were not allowed to talk about violence prone females in relation to IPV for decades, that veil is lifted and we now have studies showing parity in IPV and that the strongest predicter of a woman being injured by IPV is her own violenve and so potential for a much better frame work for treating the problem of IPV in the future.

    Discussions about rape are similarly hindered, we are not allowed to say "thats sounds like a imbecilic sexual encounter by two young people who have not yey learned how to handle themselves and give and read unclear and mixed signals". We have to call that "victim blaming", and the imbecilic behaviour on the parts of the young people a rape, rape used to mean a violent rape (btw, the majority of male on female rapists that rape out of misplaced anger were abused in some way by a female as a child, we are not allowed to talk about that either). When we can discuss it all rationally and without dogma, a better framework for fixing the problem will emerge.

    As for "rape culture", there is no rape culture, there are damaged people that intentially rape and imbecilies that have imbecilic sexual encounters that get labelled rape.

  • http://toysoldier.wordpress.com Toysoldier

    The problem I have with the “How Not to Get Raped” advice given to women is that it does not actually do anything to prevent rape. While locking my door, or whatever, might prevent me from getting raped, that rapist is going to keep checking doors until he finds one that is open. Not getting shitty drunk at a frat party might keep me from getting raped, but that rapist will just find another victim.

    It is impossible to prevent all sexual violence, unless one intends to control all humans' behavior. The logic behind the advice given to women is the same as the logic behind advising people to wear their seat belts. Will your wearing a seat belt prevent all people's injuries resulting from traffic accidents? No. May it prevent you from being injured? Yes.

    We should not toss out valid advice because it does not completely eradicate the problem. I would love to prevent all sexual violence, but I cannot. However, I can advise people to protect themselves. Granted, stranger assaults happen less than assaults committed by a person one knows, so the advice applies to a certain set of situations. That does not mean it is bad advice.

    As for expecting people not to rape, you can expect whatever you want, but you might not like the result.

  • snobographer

    I want rapists to make statements to the media every day. Because I guaran-goddam-tee you their mentalities are at one with those of victim blamers and rape apologists like christellar, Toy Soldier, ElDiablo666, Harry, Eo, TT, et al.

    In this particular case, the (convicted) rapist just beat them to the punch.

  • Melissa

    Toysoldier:
    "The logic behind the advice given to women is the same as the logic behind advising people to wear their seat belts. Will your wearing a seat belt prevent all people’s injuries resulting from traffic accidents? No. May it prevent you from being injured? Yes."

    This is, to a certain extent, true. The difference is that the advice to wear seatbelts is given along with advice on how to drive safely, and how not to endanger people while you're behind the wheel. If you're going with the seatbelt analogy, then rape prevention advice is somewhat like a world with no speed limits, no traffic signals or stop signs, and a general attitude that what we would consider dangerous, reckless driving to be totally normal...and then saying "it was their own fault for not wearing a seatbelt" when people get hurt or killed in car accidents.

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  • mojo

    Hmmm not really.

    We have plenty of vehicular rules for driving, enforcement of said rules, social conventions for driving - etc

    We also have similar to the above against many forms of violent behavior including sexual assault. Neither is a "no speed zone" and 99.9% of all happenings stay on the proper side of the fence, both with in the case of violence and proper driving.

    Giving advice, with good intent, to either of the above is not victim blaming.

    This incessant need to feel victimized via the "talk" of "victim blaming" is so vapid.

  • Melanie

    It sometimes seems that "the sexist" is saying: if you caution someone against risky behavior and advise them to be careful, you are saying if they don't take your advice (or even if they do) and they get raped, you are blaming them for what the rapist did. Is there no way for society to warn women to lock their doors, not get drunk to the point of oblivion, and travel in groups without "blaming the victim" if someone who doesn't follow such advice is raped? I agree that women should be able to walk alone after dark, get as drunk as they like, and leave their doors unlocked, but that's not realistic behavior.

  • http://feminazi.wordpress.com m Andrea

    The amount of reported rapes is a small percentage of the total amount of all rapes which occur. That 8% figure identifying false accusations is a percentage of REPORTED rapes, not the total number of rapes. So it's more like false accusations are 1% of the total number of all rapes which occur.

    The other thing, is that since the police assume they are false, the accused was not likely to be arrested or charged, let alone convicted. The number of innocent rapists behind bars is GREATLY exceeded by the number of guilty rapists who are never identified at all -- by several orders of magnitude. So IF SOMEONE IS SINCERELY OUTRAGED BY INJUSTICE, as these trolls claim, then why aren't they outraged by the much larger number of guilty rapists running around free to rape again?

    Really appreciate the links by Laura Burton, btw. Thank you!

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