Posts Tagged ‘print’

Uppers and Downers

Denis Suski gestures at his backyard, at the ample greenery and the picnic table and the two yellow hand-shaped chairs that match his house’s yellow back walls. “This is my concern,” he says, “is losing things like this.”
All around him, things like that are being lost, at least to the sun’s rays. Throughout his neighborhood [...]

Rallying Cry for D.C.’s NEMBYs: “No Embassies In My Back Yard”

The National Capital Planning Commission meeting last Thursday began like all of the commission’s meetings do: with a pledge of allegiance to the flag of the United States of America. The NCPC has a funny sort of dual role. In charge of city planning for the District before the 1973 Home Rule Act transferred some [...]

Bull in Chinatown: Developer Tells Section 8 Tenants to Pay Up or Get Out

Last month, word spread among the residents of the Museum Square Apartments about a notice posted in the building informing them that they’d have to come up with $250 million or lose their homes. It wasn’t a ransom note or a mob warning, but to the tenants in the Mount Vernon Triangle residence, it might [...]

A Streetcar Named Misfire

It began, as so many budget fights do, with a line of jargon. “The Council’s plan,” explained the D.C. Council’s Committee of the Whole in its report last week on Council Chairman Phil Mendelson’s budget proposal, “adjusts the upcoming proposed streetcar paygo transfer from a fixed to a floating base year.”
That adjustment, inscrutable to all [...]

The Mold War

In 2012, shortly after returning to D.C. from medical anthropology fieldwork in Peru for her graduate program, Clare Kelley was diagnosed with kidney stones. She had what was supposed to be routine surgery, but instead of bouncing back as expected, she needed an additional four operations that year.
Things kept getting worse from there. That October, [...]

Where Are D.C.’s Homeless Families Living Now That D.C. Doesn’t Have to House Them?

After two months living with her mother, Sarah Drawn would much rather be back in the homeless shelter.
It’s not so much that living in Capitol Heights, Md., sometimes means a three-hour commute to her job on H Street NE, including a pit stop to drop her 1-year-old son off at daycare in Deanwood. Or that [...]

Why Is Overhauling the Park Morton Public Housing Complex So Difficult?

Last week, I met Adrianne Todman for an activity she wouldn’t have advised 10 or 15 years ago: a walk around the Park Morton public-housing complex in the Park View neighborhood, just off Georgia Avenue NW.
“Park was a tough, tough site,” recalls Todman, the executive director of the D.C. Housing Authority. “I would not have [...]

Canal Plus: Could a Spiffier Waterway Help Georgetown Attract Retail?

Don’t tell Josh Hermias there’s nothing new happening in Georgetown. The neighborhood may feel established, the economic development director of the Georgetown Business Improvement District says, but it’s experiencing its own boom along with the rest of the city. To wit: There are 21 residential units currently under construction in the neighborhood.
Of course, Hermias lays [...]

The Home Stretch

Nkechi Feaster’s story begins like those of so many other victims of the Great Recession. After she was laid off from her job at a law firm in 2007, work became increasingly difficult to come by. Three times over the next four years, she was hired, and three times she was laid off. Then the [...]

Ask Not What Your Street Can Do for You

On a recent Sunday afternoon, hope was in the air on the 700 block of Kennedy Street NW, and it bore the unmistakable scent of spray paint. A graffiti artist was filling the wall of an alley with a composite landscape of global wonders. The Eiffel Tower and the Washington Monument loomed over Egyptian and [...]

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