Posts Tagged ‘Kaya Henderson’

Basketball-Playing Robots and Unfairly Amazing Teachers: Henderson Imagines D.C. Schools of the Future

After her predecessor Michelle Rhee got dinged for her critics-be-damned style of radical policy overhaul, D.C. Public Schools Chancellor Kaya Henderson has taken a more measured approach, stressing continuity over disruptive change, and drawing accusations of a lack of vision in the process. Henderson acknowledged as much last night in her annual "State of the Schools" address, [...]

Bricks and Mortarboard: Can New Buildings Turn Around D.C.’s Public Schools?

As class let out last Monday, the scene outside Dunbar High School felt like the close of a typical school day. Teenagers in black polos streamed into the street, where friends and family waited. A security guard urged them along, shouting repeatedly, “C’mon, let’s clear the front. Let’s go. Let’s go!”
But there was an extra [...]

Back to School With Mayor Gray and Chancellor Henderson

It's 8:15 in the morning, and children are streaming into Powell Elementary School. They return the Spanish-language greetings of Principal Janeece Docal, and gamely give high-fives to the strange, grinning woman with an outstretched palm at the Petworth school's entrance.
The woman is D.C. Public Schools Chancellor Kaya Henderson, and Powell is her first stop on a [...]

D.C.’s Best and Worst Schools by Math and Reading Proficiency

So D.C.'s schools are improving: In the past year, D.C. Public Schools and public charter school students averaged a 3.9 percent increase in math proficiency and a 4.1 percent increase in reading proficiency, according to the 2013 District of Columbia Comprehensive Assessment System. Those are the biggest gains in the system since 2008.
“Our approach, with great educators [...]

City Amends Rules for Charters to Take Over Vacant Schools

Back in June, Lydia wrote about D.C. charter schools' struggle to find classroom space. On the surface, conditions seemed favorable: Former Mayor Adrian Fenty's administration had closed 23 public schools, leaving what ought to have been ideal buildings for the charter schools to move into. But the byzantine process for procuring those buildings left the [...]

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