Posts Tagged ‘income’

D.C. Incomes, and Poverty Level, Flat Since Recession’s End

The economic recovery from the recession has sent stock prices and D.C. housing costs upward, but it hasn't resulted in higher incomes for District residents.
According to 2013 American Community Survey data released today by the U.S. Census Bureau, the median household income in the D.C. area was $90,149 last year, a small but statistically insignificant [...]

Real Incomes in the D.C. Area Are Falling

Per-capita income in the D.C. region is $61,743 as of 2012. That sounds pretty high. Between 2008 and 2012, per-capita income in the region increased by 5.4 percent. That sounds pretty good.
Except that incomes weren't the only thing rising. According to a new report from the Center for Regional Analysis at George Mason University, the [...]

D.C.: A City of Makers (and Takers)

In the simplistic paradigm adopted by some conservatives, the people of the world can be divided into makers and takers. The makers earn their money; the takers leech off the system (and the makers) by deriving their income from the government-imposed largesse of others.
So is D.C. a city of makers or takers? According to a [...]

On Income Growth, D.C. Comes in at…No. 17

Rejoice, Washingtonians! Your city has the 17th-fastest-growing average income in the country!
OK, so maybe that's not all that impressive. After all, with our 9.7 percent growth rate between 2007 and 2011, we're no Chico, Calif., which came in at No. 1 with a whopping 32 percent increase, according to Nerd Wallet.
Then again, we probably don't [...]

Mapping Metro by Race and Income

Back in April, data whiz Chris Dickersin-Prokopp created a map for Washington City Paper showing the median income for each Metro stop in the system. Now, Metro's planning blog, PlanItMetro, supplements his effort with two maps of its own: one depicting income, the other race.
The income map looks very similar to Dickersin-Prokopp's, with wealth concentrated in western D.C. [...]

D.C. Area More Upwardly Mobile Than Most

The New York Times published a wonderful interactive study today that breaks down income mobility by geography. The most upwardly mobile areas are in the Great Plains—in some parts of North Dakota, a person born into the bottom income quintile has more than a 30 percent chance of ending up in the top quintile—and major [...]

A City Divided—But More Than Most?

I spent some time this morning playing around with a nifty tool that breaks down American neighborhood incomes by census tract. It's a great way to see how divided a city is along income lines. So is D.C. more income-segregated than other major American cities? Let's take a look. Green = rich, red = poor, yellow/white = [...]

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