Posts Tagged ‘Gentrification’

Which D.C. Neighborhoods Were Gentrifying in 1979?

Over at Greater Greater Washington, D.C. historian John Muller made a great find: a June 1979 map of the city from the Department of Housing and Community Development. The map, titled "Housing Problems, Conditions & Trends in the District of Columbia," labels the D.C. neighborhoods that were on the rise and fall 35 years ago.
It was a hopeful [...]

For Longtime Residents, Sometimes Gentrification Isn’t All Bad

There's nothing more divisive in the District than the G-word. Gentrification conjures up images of omnipresent dog boutiques and $5 lattes in what used to be working-class, wallet-friendly neighborhoods. The well-heeled people moving in call it neighborhood revival; the poorer folks being priced out call it displacement.
Except it's not that simple. Most longtime residents of [...]

D.C.’s Most Honest Realtor

A friend of a Washington City Paper staffer came across this ad in the 14th Street NW Peregrine Espresso. Way to own it, Mr. Pike!

Is Congress Heights Gentrifying?

Back in June, the Washington Business Journal's Michael Neibauer and I had a little disagreement about a study of D.C. neighborhoods. The study identified 18 neighborhoods that were poorer than the citywide average in 2001 and whose median income and property values have risen faster than the city average since then. Neibauer wrote that these neighborhoods were [...]

Barry Farm and Congress Heights Gentrifying? Not Quite.

The Washington Business Journal reported yesterday on a new study of 18 "gentrifying" neighborhoods—areas "whose median property value and federal adjusted gross income fell below the citywide average in 2001, and rose above it 10 years later." The paper writes, "Many are not what, or where, you’d think."
No, they're not. Columbia Heights? Petworth? Sure, I'll [...]

Census Porn: D.C. Gets Whiter, Denser

Housing Complex likes data. Today we got some, in the form of a special report from the Census Bureau that compares the 2000 and 2010 censuses. Here are the (few) bits that relate to D.C.
Of all metropolitan areas, the D.C. region had the fifth-largest increase in people "downtown," defined as the area within two miles [...]

Home Is Where the Hardware Store Is

Last Saturday was a banner day for Anne Stom. She’d worked for a year and a half, borrowing money against her Newton Street house and bringing in 20 small investors to cobble together the $750,000 it took to start an 18,000-item hardware store in an old auto body shop on Upshur Street. She’d practically lived [...]

The Week That Was

Did anything actually happen in Housing Complex world while everyone was busy recapping the last year and ringing in the next? Not much, but a few stories of note. Herewith, a review.

The Czech company that made D.C.'s first three streetcars has appealed the District's decision to award a contract for the next pair to a [...]

Marion Barry Calls For Gentrification Commission

It was a conversation that promised to be interesting, with this headline: DOES GENTRIFICATION MEAN ERADICATION? The office of Councilmember Marion Barry convened a panel of Ward 8 Advisory Neighborhood Commissioners and community members last night to chew over the question, and at his behest, a group of interested citizens will continue to chew it [...]

Harry Jaffe Flip Flops on Change

Neighborhood change: It's a tricky topic. People feel different ways about it. But widely-read metro columnists should probably figure out a coherent philosophy before dashing off opinions, right?
Not according to longtime D.C. writer Harry Jaffe, now with the Examiner. Jaffe leads this morning's column:
Change is coming in Washington neighborhoods. It's driven by natural, cyclical [...]

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