Housing Complex

The Suburban Poverty Shift

poverty

As protests over the shooting of an unarmed teenager continue to roil Ferguson, Mo., the Brookings Institution takes a look at the socioeconomic context of the town's social unrest. The unemployment rate in the St. Louis suburb increased from less than 5 percent in 2000 to more than 13 percent in 2010-2012. For residents who do have a job, real earnings declined by a third. The poverty rate doubled.

It's a trend, Brooking points out, that's common to suburbs around the country. In nearly every major metropolitan area, suburban poverty has increased over the past decade; it's also become more concentrated in high-poverty neighborhoods.

The D.C. area's no exception. Brookings recently published metro area-level data on urban and suburban poverty in an interactive feature that highlights the divergence between the District and its suburbs.

In the "primary cities" of the D.C. region—namely D.C., Arlington, and Alexandria—the population in poverty declined by 3.5 percent between 2000 and 2008-2012. Meanwhile, the percentage of poor people living in both census tracts with 20 percent or higher poverty and census tracts with 40 percent or higher poverty declined. In other words, poverty became less prevalent and less concentrated.

Compare that to the rest of the metro area. There, poverty shot up by more than 42 percent. And the percentage of poor people living in tracts with at least 20 percent poverty increased from 4.2 percent to 14 percent. (The share living in tracts with at least 40 percent poverty remained at zero.)

To an extent, of course, this inversion is simply a correction for the patterns of the second half of the past century, which saw a flight of wealth to the suburbs and an increasing concentration of poverty in the District. Now, with the city growing increasingly desirable and expensive, some low-income residents are being pushed out to the suburbs of Prince George's County and elsewhere. From a cynical perspective, this has benefits for the District: Poor people, like families with children, are a drag on city resources. But for the sake of the city's social fabric, as well as its ability to retain the workers who keep the city running, it's not a trend that's sustainable in the long term. Nor, of course, is it a welcome one for the suburbs that now find themselves subject to many of the challenges once reserved for the inner city.

Chart made with Chartbuilder using data from Brookings

  • CharleyX

    For one thing, when poor people (uneducated blacks) move into a neighborhood, those with money (whites) move out.

    Economic inequality is caused because while GDP increases wealth for those who invest, you can't get any poorer than poor. Zero money doesn't grow. Investing or saving increases wealth. You have to have something to invest to begin with. Duh!

    When poor people (blacks)get tired of being poor and decide to get an education instead of "taking all that money away from all them white rich guys and giving it to all them po' folks", you might see a closing of the income gap.

    All people get out of bed every day and decide what they will personally do with their life THAT DAY. Apparently, being poor all day, every day is OK with a certain class of them. Just an observation based on the end result.

  • Adam 12

    Charleyx, why are you focusing on blacks only? There are very poor Salvadorans, Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, Dominicans, and other Central and South Americans. Also, there are poor whites too.

  • Adam 12

    CharleyX, all you need is a white sheet to cover your head and you're become a proud member of the KKK.

  • cminus

    @CharleyX, among the many, many, problems with your argument is that starting in the 90s white people with money moved *into* DC, which had the most poor black people of any jurisdiction in the area. Is it possible that your racism has blinded you into believing that everyone thinks like you do?

  • Northwesterneer

    C-Minus is definitely right. In the 1990s Most major cities had reverse migration headed by liberals who entirely grew up in integrated environments- call it the Seinfeld or Friends effect, whatever, it's a known thing. The heart of Charley's theory, even at its heart, was over by 1980.

    Where there is racism in new integration, in 2014, the previous homeowners do not, in fact, move. What they do is rely on the police or private security to enforce social order.

    We saw this with Trayvon Martin and with Michael Brown. Anyone living in America today knows that's how racism acts today. Charley... Charley has been corrected by me, and owes me some thanks for correcting his mistaken idea. No he knows he's wrong.

  • http://dcvacantproperties.blogspot.com Mari InShaw

    "In the "primary cities" of the D.C. region—namely D.C., Arlington, and Alexandria—the population in poverty declined by 3.5 percent between 2000 and 2008-2012. Meanwhile, the percentage of poor people living in both census tracts with 20 percent or higher poverty and census tracts with 40 percent or higher poverty declined. In other words, poverty became less prevalent and less concentrated."

    Yay, that is good news. The poor we shall always have with us, and concentrated poverty is a bad thing. So it is better that it is spread out a bit more, which means it's spreading out into the 'burbs. Now if the poor start concentrating in the 'burbs then that would be bad, or like Paris.

  • Pingback: Homepage

  • Meh

    Better to have poverty concentrated in the external suburbs like Paris, then in central cities. Poverty concentrated and warehoused in central cities is very unhealthy development pattern that reduces investment into urban transit, environmentally better development patterns, and it increases car usage in general. The better pattern is wealth towards the center and high demand in cities, then poverty in the outer burbs. Warehousing poverty in the city just leads to urban blight and network effects leading to far higher crime, which is far worse then suburban blight. Gentrification is not a problem, it is the solution to a problem, leading to far better habitation patterns and land usage.

  • Pingback: cozy cove

  • Pingback: xlovecam token gratuit t�l�charger

  • Pingback: legal separation

  • Pingback: hearthstone arena guide

  • Pingback: 5 star rated lawyer in Philadelphia

  • Pingback: http://www.jcsm.org/

  • Pingback: Commercial Real Estate Miami Beach

  • Pingback: commercial realty

  • Pingback: warehouse for sale Miami

  • Pingback: billige wallstickers

  • Pingback: commercial property for sale

  • Pingback: glitter hit

  • Pingback: apple computer

  • Pingback: jintropin

  • Pingback: jintropin

  • Pingback: Blue Coaster33

  • Pingback: streaming movies

  • Pingback: watch movies online free

  • Pingback: watch tv show episodes

  • Pingback: water ionizer

  • Pingback: kangen water machine

  • Pingback: kangen

  • Pingback: unblock viber

  • Pingback: uk online casinos

  • Pingback: tvpackages.net

  • Pingback: lan penge her og nu

  • Pingback: mobile porn movies

  • Pingback: laan penge nu og her 18 aar

  • Pingback: car parking

  • Pingback: water ionizer machine

  • Pingback: water ionizer loans

...