Housing Complex

BID Heads Do Pretty Well

Georgetown, whose BID president draws a comparatively humble salary. (Lydia DePillis)

The other day, I raised my eyebrows at Downtown D.C. Business Improvement District President Richard Bradley's $405,000 salary last year (that's quite a bit more than most of the leaders of the free world). But in proportion to what the BID draws in its special assessment tax, and compared to the other BIDs around the city, it's not actually that bad.

Here's each BID's 2010 executive director salary and benefits, total revenue, and the ratio of one to the other, from smallest to largest:

1. Adams Morgan -$80,520 salary – $616,640 revenue – 13 percent

2. Capitol Hill - $138,254 – $1,309,659 – 10 percent

3. Capitol Riverfront - $167,308 – $1,724,546 – 10 percent

4. NoMa – $179,249 – $1,844,237 – 10 percent

5. Golden Triangle – $258,467 – $3,509,761 – 7.4 percent

6. Georgetown - $139,167 – $4,763,572 – 3 percent

7. Downtown - $405,437 – $10,351,018 – 4 percent

The big takeaway: Georgetown's Jim Bracco should ask for a raise!

  • A-lo

    What about Mt Vernon?

  • Native

    If you own commercial property in a BID zone, that's where a fat percentage of your taxes go. What a joke.

  • John Dollop

    Why on earth would they command such high salaries? How about re-dedicating that $ to paving streets, etc.

  • StrangeFruit

    @ Native and John,

    Good Points!

  • er

    what constitutes a "fat percentage of your taxes"?

  • Typical DC BS

    @Lydia: my big takeaway is that they should all be reduced EXCEPT FOR Georgetown and Adams Morgan. The amount they get paid is ridiculous. Another example of lax oversight and no standards being applied.

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