Housing Complex

Worst Cities for Pedestrians

pedestrianabouttodie

Check out the guy, center of the road, toward the back: Uh, oh.

For all the District's talk of dangerous pedestrian corridors—and it's commendable, absolutely— we're doing pretty well here.  I suspect that this has much less to do with road maps than overall drivers' attitudes: They know people and vehicles share the road. We look for each other, wave in acknowledgment, and gesture to suggest "No, no, you wait—I'm gonna keep walking now."

It works.  They apparently have a different way of going about things in Florida, though. Behold, below, a ranking of the worse cities for pedestrians. It's part of a report, out yesterday, put together by Transportation for America.

D.C.'s below the jump.

Ranking Metropolitan Area Average Annual Pedestrian
Deaths per 100,000
Residents (2007-2008)
Percent of Workers
Walking to Work (2000)
Pedestrian Danger
Index (PDI)
1 Orlando-Kissimmee, FL 2.86 1.3% 221.5
2 Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, FL 3.52 1.7% 205.5
3 Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Pompano Beach, FL 3.04 1.7% 181.2
4 Jacksonville, FL 2.61 1.7% 157.4
5 Memphis, TN-MS-AR 1.83 1.3% 137.7
6 Raleigh-Cary, NC 2.02 1.6% 128.6
7 Louisville/Jefferson County, KY-IN 1.93 1.7% 114.8
8 Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, TX 1.81 1.6% 112.4
9 Birmingham-Hoover, AL 1.30 1.2% 110.0
10 Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, GA 1.37 1.3% 108.3
11 Las Vegas-Paradise, NV 2.46 2.3% 105.6
12 Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord, NC-SC 1.29 1.2% 103.9
13 Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, TX 1.47 1.5% 99.3
14 Detroit-Warren-Livonia, MI 1.41 1.4% 98.5
15 New Orleans-Metairie-Kenner, LA 2.69 2.7% 98.4
16 Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, AZ 2.02 2.1% 97.0
17 Oklahoma City, OK 1.59 1.7% 95.3
18 Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, CA 1.94 2.2% 89.5
19 Austin-Round Rock, TX 1.76 2.1% 84.8
20 Kansas City, MO-KS 1.18 1.4% 84.6
21 St. Louis, MO-IL 1.28 1.7% 76.9
22 Sacramento–Arden-Arcade–Roseville, CA 1.64 2.2% 75.9
23 Denver-Aurora, CO 1.59 2.1% 75.6
24 Richmond, VA 1.35 1.8% 74.5
25 Tucson, AZ 1.88 2.6% 72.8
26 San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA 1.30 1.8% 71.9
27 Los Angeles-Long Beach-Santa Ana, CA 1.91 2.7% 70.8
28 Nashville-Davidson–Murfreesboro–Franklin, TN 1.04 1.5% 70.2
29 Baltimore-Towson, MD 1.82 2.9% 61.9
30 San Antonio, TX 1.39 2.4% 58.9
31 Indianapolis-Carmel, IN 1.00 1.7% 58.6
32 Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV 1.75 3.0% 57.2
33 San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, CA 1.89 3.4% 55.7
34 Salt Lake City, UT 1.04 2.1% 50.2
35 Columbus, OH 1.16 2.3% 49.4
36 Buffalo-Niagara Falls, NY 1.33 2.7% 49.3
37 Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, WI 1.39 2.9% 48.6
38 Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington, PA-NJ-DE-MD 1.72 3.9% 44.3
39 Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, VA-NC 1.18 2.7% 44.1
40 San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, CA 1.60 3.9% 40.9
41 Chicago-Naperville-Joliet, IL-IN-WI 1.23 3.1% 39.3
42 Providence-New Bedford-Fall River, RI-MA 1.25 3.3% 38.4
43 Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor, OH 0.81 2.2% 37.1
44 Portland-Vancouver-Beaverton, OR-WA 1.07 2.9% 36.4
45 Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, CT 0.88 2.5% 35.3
46 Cincinnati-Middletown, OH-KY-IN 0.77 2.3% 33.5
47 Rochester, NY 1.11 3.5% 31.6
48 Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue, WA 0.98 3.1% 31.1
49 Pittsburgh, PA 1.04 3.6% 29.1
50 New York-Northern New Jersey-Long Island, NY-NJ-PA 1.67 6.0% 28.1
51 Boston-Cambridge-Quincy, MA-NH 1.07 4.6% 23.2
52 Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, MN-WI 0.54 2.4% 22.3

Image by Transportation for America, Flickr Creative Commons Attribution License.

Comments

  1. #1

    Remember this data is the aggregate Washington metropolitans statistical area, not just the District of Columbia. See the map here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Dc22counties.jpg ]

    It would be more interesting see it broken out by county or zip code.

  2. #2

    Contrarian, it would be interesting to see that. By the measure of our PDI, DC would likely rise in safety as the outer suburbs (where pedestrian facilities are scarce and roads are not designed for people) would go the other direction. Unfortunately, no good dataset really exists for measuring that. You can get fatalities localized, but you can't really measure how frequently people walk at the zip/city level reliably, making it hard to compare metro to metro (based on exposure). But good points nonetheless.

  3. #3

    Actually you can if you know where to look...

    The District of Columbia is easy, see NHTSA FARS data for 2008 available on-line [DC 9 pedestrians killed, 592,000 population, rate of 1.52/100,000 population]

    County level fatality statistics are available in the
    Street Smart program annual reports avaiable on the MWCOG website [www.mwcog.org]

    And the MWCOG Transportation Planning Board (conveniently) just completed the 2007/2008 TPB Household Travel Survey which provides mode share to work by jurisdiction of residence, 11.9 percent for DC [ see slide 6 of this presentation
    http://www.mwcog.org/uploads/committee-documents/bF5cVlte20090522152315.pdf

    Pedestrian Danger Index for District of Columbia:

    [(9/592,000)*100,000]/11.9 = .13

  4. #4

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  5. #5

    ohhh nice info, keep it coming

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