City Desk

Dating App Tinder Burning Up D.C. College Students

He is in your ZIP code and thinks you’re hot—what else do you need? It’s not the most serious dating criteria, but then again, Tinder is not the most serious dating app.

Tinder allows users to find matches based solely on geographic proximity and appearance. It's not the first for straight-people clone of gay hook-up app Grindr, but it may be the most popular on D.C.'s college campuses.

“It's a narcissist’s dream,” said Alyssa, a 20-year-old student at Georgetown University. “You just sit there waiting for someone else to think you’re hot.”

The app links to Facebook and generates a list of potential mates, which the user either accepts or "regrets," rejecting them. If both users choose each other, it’s considered a match, and they can send each other messages. On college campuses like Georgetown, George Washington, and University of Maryland, students can use the app to either find someone they may already know through school or to find total strangers in a different parts of D.C. It's a way to meet other college students outside of one's social circle, or meet the elusive "young professional" urban college co-eds dream about.

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DC Water Seeks Huggable Mascot

How does DC Water keep coming up with ways to make people talk about tap water? First, they promoted local businesses that cook with the water. Then they got tap water served at the inauguration.

Now, DC Water is looking for a partner in its antics: a mascot. The utility will hold auditions to play Wendell/Wendy the Water Drop on Feb. 15 and Feb. 19.

Here are the characteristics of a successful anthropomorphized water drop, according to a DC Water flyer (PDF):

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District Line Daily: Prosperity Dividend

A morning roundup of news, opinion, and links from Washington City Paper and around the District. Send tips and ideas to citydesk@washingtoncitypaper.com. Sign up: To get District Line Daily—or any of our other email newsletters—sent straight to your mailbox, click here.

In his State of the District address last night, Mayor Vince Gray announced plans to invest the city's "prosperity dividend" from economic growth in social services and raises for city employees.

LEADING THE MORNING NEWS:

  • Spending tops on Gray's State of the District agenda. [Loose Lips]
  • Mayor wants $100 million in affordable housing. [Housing Complex]
  • Two killed in Southeast apartment fire. [Examiner]
  • Kenyan McDuffie won't push emergency ethics bill. [Examiner]
  • Meter prices could increase in hot neighborhoods. [WTOP]
  • Fairfax County teen porn ring case continues. [Post]

RECENT CITY PAPER STORIES TO HELP YOU MAKE SENSE OF YOUR DAY: (null)

The Needle: The Virginia Dollar

Funny Money: A proposal to study whether Virginia should spend more than $17,000 studying whether to have its own, separate currency passed the Commonwealth's House of Delegates yesterday. And yes, that's American money. -3

Fancy Facial Hair: The Wizards' Martell Webster says he "pampers" his beard with Moroccan oil. +1

Read more The Needle: The Virginia Dollar

D.C. Is America’s New Second City, Says Analyst

We're number two! D.C. is in the process of dethroning Chicago and Los Angeles for the spot behind New York as America's "second city," urban analyst Aaron M. Renn writes in City Journal:

Over the past decade, the D.C. area has made stunning economic and demographic progress. Meanwhile, America’s current and former Second Cities, population-wise—Los Angeles and Chicago—are battered and fading in significance. Though Washington still isn’t their match in terms of population, it’s gaining on them in terms of economic power and national importance.

In fact, we’re witnessing the start of Washington’s emergence as America’s new Second City.

Read more D.C. Is America’s New Second City, Says Analyst

Gun-Rights Ad Too Hot for D.C. Talk Radio Station

What does it take to be too conservative for talk radio station WMAL, the Washington area of home of Sean Hannity and Rush Limbaugh? We may have just found out.

World Net Daily reports that the station refused to play a song that invokes a battle of the Texas Revolution as a warning for Barack Obama and Congress about gun control. The battle in question is 1835's Battle of Gonzales, when Mexican soldiers tried to take a cannon but were beaten back by Texan settlers.

Almost two centuries later, the battle inspired singer Steve Vaus to write "Come and Take It," a pretty catchy country song that also serves as an aggressive metaphor about current gun-control proposals. "It's a message to the president and to the members of Congress, with a little reminder of history," Vaus tells City Desk.

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District Line Daily: America’s Most Congested City

A morning roundup of news, opinion, and links from Washington City Paper and around the District. Send tips and ideas to citydesk@washingtoncitypaper.com. Sign up: To get District Line Daily—or any of our other email newsletters—sent straight to your mailbox, click here.

Defending champs come through again: Washington has retained its title as the country's most congested city.

LEADING THE MORNING NEWS:

  • Tommy Wells wants nurse-to-patient floor in city hospitals. [Examiner]
  • And gears up for mayoral run. [Examiner]
  • In honor of the release of Michelle Rhee's book today, a flashback: What's the Harry Jaffe connection?
  • Judge says D.C. attorney general Irv Nathan's "honor" is in question over Pershing Park documents. [Loose Lips]
  • Hammer-wielding bandits rob Pentagon City jewelry store. [Post]
  • Metro claims mobbing floors with special chemical makes them less slippery. [Examiner]
  • Woman robs two D.C. banks. [Examiner]
  • Food truck prevails in Arlington vending case. [WTOP]
  • D.C. police, union officially at odds over contract. [Examiner]

RECENT CITY PAPER STORIES TO HELP YOU MAKE SENSE OF YOUR DAY: (null)

The Needle: Annandale Mafia

Thunder Rolls: Han Sa "Thunder" Yu, the 44-year-old leader of a gang of Annandale extortionists that went by the extraordinary name Korean Night Breeders, was sentenced to 17 1/2 years in prison last week after pleading guilty. +3

Colonel Blimp: Two defense blimps, worth a combined $450 million, could launch around D.C. as soon as late September for a three-year test. +1

Read more The Needle: Annandale Mafia

D.C. Inmate Who Says Shower Burned His Genitals Wants $1 Million

As if being imprisoned wasn't bad enough, a new lawsuit from a former Washington inmate alleges there's another threat lurking in Washington's correctional facilities: the showers.

Robert Morris was imprisoned at the Correctional Treatment Facility, a building  located next to the D.C. Jail that's run by the private Corrections Corporation of America, on Sept. 20, 2012. When he got in the shower, he alleged got a surprise: According to his lawsuit, the temperature spiked.

"There was a sudden, very rapid, and quite extreme temperature change and it burned him in the genital area," says Geoffrey D. Allen, Morris's attorney. The lawsuit alleges that Corrections Corporation of America employees already knew about the showers' tendency to shoot out scalding water, which Allen likens to the changes in temperature when multiple showers in one house are turned on, but much worse.

Read more D.C. Inmate Who Says Shower Burned His Genitals Wants $1 Million

Photo: Two Women

Hirshhorn Museum, February 1

Washington Post Hires First African-American Managing Editor

Washington Post National editor Kevin Merida is ascending to the managing editor spot vacated last month by Liz Spayd, according to an announcement by the paper. With Merida's promotion, the Post is getting its first African-American managing editor—and a reshuffle of portfolios for Merida and the paper's other managing editor, John Temple.

"[Merida] is a journalist of remarkable accomplishment, but also a warm and caring colleague. And he has a record of proven leadership," Executive Editor Martin Baron wrote in a morning memo to staff.

Read more Washington Post Hires First African-American Managing Editor

Sonia Sotomayor’s Neighbors Totally Have a Crush on Her

Supreme Court justices: They have homes, just like us. And while the New York Times may have pioneered the "Sonia Sotomayor lives on U Street" genre, the Post has a new contribution that proves, conclusively, that Sotomayor's neighbors are engaged in a condo association-wide crush on the justice.

Just take a look at the evidence.

They treasure her phone number:

“She slipped a note under my door, saying something like, ‘I apologize in advance if there’s construction noise,’” said Makarainen, a White House analyst. “She gave me her number, so I feel privileged by that.”

They wonder what she's ordering online:

Roger Ghatt, a nonprofit executive who is another building resident, said he tries hard to pretend that the justice is simply another occupant. But that feeling lasts only so long. “You go into the mailroom, and your package from Amazon is sitting next to hers,” he said. “And then I wonder what the justice orders from Amazon.”

Read more Sonia Sotomayor’s Neighbors Totally Have a Crush on Her

District Line Daily: Gold Bust

A morning roundup of news, opinion, and links from Washington City Paper and around the District. Send tips and ideas to citydesk@washingtoncitypaper.com. Sign up: To get District Line Daily—or any of our other email newsletters—sent straight to your mailbox, click here.

The morning after we were reminded of the importance of electricity, one question remains: How much should D.C. football fans be celebrating the Ravens' win? On one hand, the M in DMV is there for a reason. On the other, reports that most of the D.C. area is wearing purple today seem unlikely.

LEADING THE MORNING NEWS:

  • First murder victim of 2013 killed a man in 1990. [Post]
  • ANC commissioner Matthew Frumin leads in at-large fundraising. [Loose Lips]
  • CFO Natwar Gandhi is resigning. [Loose Lips]
  • What councilmembers want in his replacement. [Examiner]
  • Battle over Monet painting for Corcoran hinges on different versions of wills. [Post]
  • Shaw drug bust leads to nine arrests. [Examiner]
  • Michelle Rhee regrets firing a principal in front of camera crew. [Post]

RECENT CITY PAPER STORIES TO HELP YOU MAKE SENSE OF YOUR DAY: (null)

The Needle: 9 to 5

Make It Rain: Washington is the best city for women's salaries, according to Forbes. +5

Revisionist History: The Weekly Standard is using the Pug's Dirty Asian Summer Punch fiasco an example of political correctness gone mad. But what's so wrong with telling a bar that it can't hang up a slant-eyed Asian caricature? -3

Read more The Needle: 9 to 5

Dudes to Help Dudes Get Perfect Skin

Men of Washington who want to glisten, here's some good news. With the opening of W Men, D.C. is getting a dermatologist that's just for guys.

Washingtonian bills K Street's W Men as "the world’s first clinical practice dedicated to men’s dermatology and advanced cosmetic treatments." But will this dermatologist be like all the old-fashioned girly ones, in that it employs women? Aww, hell no.

Emphasis added:

Read more Dudes to Help Dudes Get Perfect Skin

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