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District Line Daily: Post Impressionism

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This week's Washington City Paper is out today and it's all about the sale of the Washington Post. Read more to find out what's next for the Graham family, what it all means for the paper's real estate on L Street NW, and some sage advice for Jeff Bezos from the paper's former ombudsman.


  • Now that the Washington Post Company is Post-less, what's next for the Graham's company? [City Paper]
  • Construction on the M Street NW bicycle path has been delayed three months until October.  [WAMU]
  • The District launched a new smartphone app to help sexual assault victims find medical help, counseling, and contact the police. [Post]
  • About 1,000 dead fish were found dead in a pond near the National Mall. The National Park Service is surveying the pond today. [NBC4]


What's in a Name? The results of City Paper's reader competition to rename the Washington Post Company.

Emergency Repairs: At least four District ambulances were shoddily repaired by replacing their heat shields with no-parking signs.

Post 'Scripts:  Friendly journalists offer some words of wisdom to Jeff Bezos.

Run Joe: How the memorial to Chuck Brown ended up with no music venue.


LOOSE LIPS LINKS, by Will Sommer (tips?

  • Police department investigates ambulance fires. [WAMU]
  • Post ed board: Mayor Vince Gray "doesn't have the spine" to tell residents about his 2010 campaign. [Post]
  • Former attorney general Peter Nickles says Gray stole the election. [WJLA]
  • Teacher's union collegial with DCPS ahead of contract negotiations. [Post]
  • The Office of Tax and Revenue is underassessing property values. [Housing Complex]
  • Cabbies still holding off on credit card machines. [WAMU]
  • 1,000 dead fish discovered in a pond on the Mall. [NBC 4]
  • ABC Board drops maximum corkage fee rule for wine. [Young & Hungry]
  • New app offers help for sexual assault victims. [Post]
  • How Chuck Brown's memorial lost its amphitheater [Arts Desk]

HOUSING COMPLEX LINKS, by Aaron Wiener (tips?

  • How the Chuck Brown Memorial went sour. [Arts Desk]
  • Church succeeds in killing M Street cycletrack for a block. [WAMU]
  • Silver Line test train derails. [Post]
  • Ambulance broken? Shove a parking sign in it. [LL]
  • Why going an extra stop on the Blue Line costs less. [PlanItMetro]
  • Transit is worth a lot to a city. [Atlantic Cities]
  • Here comes the stadium deal criticism. [WBJ]
  • Sewer upgrades could bring new bike lanes. [GGW]
  • The value of empty buses. [Streetsblog]
  • Stay here, get a free bike. [UrbanTurf]
  • What's JBG doing in NoMa? No one really knows. [WBJ]
  • Even the D.C. of old was never this bad. [Streetsblog]
  • Today on the market: Benning Road condo

ARTS LINKS, by Ally Schweitzer (tips?

  • Big local theater companies would like to see the Helen Hayes Awards divided into tiers for small and large companies. [Post]
  • Capital Fringe Festival adds site-specific works to the mix. [Capital Fringe via Survey Monkey]
  • Clearly writing for white, well-to-do theatergoers, Chris Henley assures D.C. Theatre Scene readers that Anacostia Playhouse is not dangerous. [D.C. Theatre Scene]
  • Stereogum shows Shy Glizzy's Law 2 mixtape some love. [Stereogum]
  • Stop perpetuating idiotic Baltimore vs. D.C. flame wars, implores Baltimore City Paper's Brandon Weigel [Baltimore City Paper]

FOOD LINKS, by Jessica Sidman (tips?

  • The eight best butchers in D.C. [DCist]
  • More details on R.J. Cooper's Gypsy Soul [Washingtonian]
  • Xavier Cervera rehiring staff at his old restaurants as consultants. [Hill Rag]
  • Five bars where you can drink with your dog [Drink DC]
  • Where to eat gazpacho [Eater]
  • Border Springs Farm shuts down its Union Market stand. [Post]
  • Five newcomers to try during D.C. Restaurant Week [Zagat]
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