City Desk

American Students Attack School Over Facebook Loan Advice

Apparently, some American University students don't like being told that they're screwing up their student loans. Especially when that advice is coming from the school whose high tuition they took those loans out to pay for in the first place.

On Monday, American posted on its Facebook page to ask students to try taking out federal loans before turning to private lenders. But students weren't happy that the school didn't realize federal loans couldn't cover the entire cost of American's nearly $40,000 yearly tuition.

"Are you kidding?" asked one student. "Do you honestly believe we take out loans for any reason besides needing to?"

So far, the incendiary post has earned 93 comments, most of them negative.

"We understand that these issues create some concern for many students and their families, but we believe deeply in the great value of an AU education," writes American spokeswoman Maralee Csellar in an email to City Desk. Csellar points to a recent Wall Street Journal article that mentioned American's efforts to teach students about college costs.

But that might not help students incensed over the Facebook post. "Basically what you're saying is only rich people should be going to your school because only they can afford it," wrote one American student.

Photo by Flickr user jakewaage used under a Creative Commons license.

Blog Widget by LinkWithin
  • electedface

    Student debt is stunting the growth of the economy. Student loans have increased by 275% over past decade. As the next generation graduates from college, they are plagued by insurmountable debt that places demands on their income, limiting their ability to spend their earnings in ways that stimulate the economy.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mRA9ndc1pCM

  • Typical DC BS

    That student finally hit the nail on the head with her last comment about only rich students being able to attend. You have to be a moron to pay over $40,000 / year for an undergraduate education. Walking out of that institution with student debt probably over $100,000? That's insane.

...