City Desk

Morning Roundup: The ‘Fall Back, Spring Ahead, Be More Tired’ Edition


Good morning, City Desk. The bad news is it's raining. The good news is water falling from the sky can't change the fact that it's Friday. It just is!

Your mini-roundup: Mayor Adrian Fenty's been raising a lot of cash. A D.C. inmate escapes, then gets tired. Maryland doesn't want to tax sin. And Times Square is coming to Gallery Place?

Daylight Saving Time begins this weekend—fall back, spring ahead—which means we'll all lose an hour of sleep in the name of saving time (huh?). It was Benjamin Franklin who first suggested the idea way back in 1784 in an essay called "An Economical Project for Diminishing the Cost of Light," which is exactly the type of essay one would expect from Benjamin Franklin.

An Englishman named William Willett who liked to get up early and force everyone else to gets the real credit, though. He thought it was stupid that people would draw their shades at night even though it was still light out, so he wrote a pamphlet in 1907 called  "The Waste of Daylight" and then the idea took off (apparently pamphlets trump essays). Actually, it was all much more complicated than that, but see, this is a Morning Roundup, not a history book.

The loss of sleep will make for some cranky people—read: me—in the office next week, but that is not all. City Desk has learned that DST is also dangerous! According to some very scientific research, the number of heart attacks spikes in the first few days after the time change. Men are more likely to commit suicide. There are more traffic accidents on the Monday after. And: "Economists have found that sleep-deprived traders typically produce 'large negative returns on financial-market indices' in the week following the shift." (Don't traders do that anyway?)

Given all that, I think I'm just going to do what Arizona and Hawaii and Guam and American Samoa do: Go by the old time, and be an hour early for everything. Or is it an hour late?

Happy Friday!

Blog Widget by LinkWithin
  • Contrarian

    And don't forget most of Indiana doesn't change, well at least the parts that don't want to be part of Chicago or Cincinnati...