City Desk

Post Reporter Hopes Protesters March on Post Building over Chandra Series

In an internal communique, Washington Post Metro reporter Robert Pierre lashed out at the paper's management for running the ongoing series on the murder of Chandra Levy. Pierre wrote that he found it "unconscionable" that the paper would devote a year and 12 chapters to the murder of a white woman, when around 200 people per year are murdered in the District–most of them male African Americans. The other local murder that "captivated" the Post, in Pierre's telling, claimed the life of New York Times journalist David E. Rosenbaum. "Also white," writes Pierre, who directed his outburst at Post Ombudsman Deborah Howell.

Then Pierre puts his rhetoric into overdrive: "Seems like either an awful big coincidence or just recognition that, to us, a white life is worth more than a black one. I personally hope that people march on the paper and throw the papers back. It is absolutely absurd and dare I say, racist, at its core." Pierre goes on to discuss how he wrote up a couple of inches of copy on a recent murder victim, but his editors cut it over space concerns. "But we can devote 12 days, thousands of man-hours, and a year of investigation to one white woman."

Executive Editor Leonard Downie Jr. says he hasn't discussed the matter with Pierre. Pierre didn't return a request for comment.

Investigative chief Jeff Leen responded to Pierre's criticisms by pointing out–as he has in another forum–that the Chandra thing is an expose of bad policing and the impact of pack journalism on a criminal investigation–as opposed to a prurient look at the murder of a glamorous white woman.

Leen has asked people to withhold their judgment till they've read the entire series.

Check out the truth about all this, in twelve parts, after the jump.

1) The series sucks for journalists and media critics. I hate the series because it doesn't advance the story too much. Each time I read a chapter, I get a familiarity attack and wonder why I am wasting my time. Other people steeped in media have found the same thing, whining about the Post's commitment of resources to this old story, wondering what's new here, what's groundbreaking. It's a lot of snobbish insularity that adds up to not much. And, of course, it's premature; we are all reserving our judgment until we've read the whole thing.

2) The series is great for the non-media critics–i.e., the public.. I interviewed a regular old reader of the Post last week about the series and expected the same attitude and nastiness that I'd been hearing from my friends in the media. That didn't happen. She just went on and on about how readable and digestible the thing was, and how inherently fascinating the story was. Of course, she was reserving judgment because she was only a few chapters in at the time.

3) Pierre's Rosenbaum charge is specious. The Rosenbaum case was fascinating on its face. Here was a white guy who went out for a walk in his quiet neighborhood of upper Northwest and ended up dead. The EMTs who came to "rescue" him thought he was a drunk who'd passed out. Turns out he'd been bludgeoned in a robbery. He was basically left to die on a gurney in a hallway of Howard University Hospital. The paper's Metro section wasn't fascinated with this case and did kind of a cursory job in reporting on it. The one guy who was fascinated with the case was columnist Colbert I. King, the former deputy editorial page editor. King sunk his chompers into this case and never, ever let go. Via several of his trademark Saturday columns, King told every last maddening, incompetent twist of this story–a body of work that may well have fetched a Pulitzer for the Post, if only it had shown the good sense to pass it along. King is a black man. Of course, it's best to withhold judgment on the Rosenbaum....oh, no, that case is finished.

4) The Post is no slouch on investigative reporting on minorities. In his rebuttal to Pierre, Leen cites numerous investigative projects that have indeed focused on African Americans, including its 1998 Pulitzer-winning series on shootings by D.C. cops, another on closing homicides, another on group homes for the mentally retarded, etc. Of course, let's withhold our comparisons till the Chandra series concludes.

5) Rosa Lee! If Pierre thinks one year and 12 quickie stories is too much, try reading one of these installments with your morning coffee! Leon Dash spent four years on the story of Rosa Lee Cunningham, a project that dripped out in eight parts. Refill, please! And while you're getting caffeinated, be sure to withhold your opinions on the Chandra series till all the rehash is complete.

6) What about Bob Kaiser? I've had it up to here with people who say that the Chandra series presents, like, a new way to present investigative journalism. Leen himself has said it. Obviously those folks don't know a thing about Gerald S.J. Cassidy. Does "Citizen K Street" mean absolutely nothing to you morons? It's fair, at this point, to render judgment on whether the recycled Chandra story line embodies novel storytelling techniques.

7) Watch box episode is overplayed. I swear, if I ever see another reference to Gary Condit's creepy disposal of a Tag Heuer watch box, I will, um, not wait to render judgment on this execrable series of stories.

8)Levy family wearing out welcome. My heart goes out to them; my compassion goes out to them; my sympathy goes out to them; my best wishes go out to them. But my time, at this point, can no longer go out to Chandra Levy's heartbroken parents. I just can't process any more of their thoughts on this case. Of course, I will attempt to withhold judgment on just how little interest I retain in their reflections until the current series concludes.

9) Is writing a series about one white woman inherently racist? Pierre's argument is yes, it is, considering that black men are falling all around us in great numbers. Where's the investigative team on that story? This is one question that's fully debatable without withholding judgment on the series until it concludes.

10) Protesters won't materialize just because Pierre writes in an internal message that he'd welcome them. And it's unlikely that people would throw their papers back at the building. No one subscribes to the paper anymore, so there's nothing to throw; maybe they'll make big signs saying "washingtonpost.com" and throw them at the building. If Pierre really wants to see picketers out front, he must show some organizing skills–call the NAACP, meet with student groups, fire some people up. Every great movement has a leader, and the Washington Post-is-racist-because-it-shares-the-public's-fascination-with-Chandra-Levy uprising is no different. In Pierre's defense, perhaps he's delaying his organizing until he finishes reading the entire series.

11) New revelation: Cops and prosecutors argue over case! As if that's never before happened–but perhaps more will be revealed if only we withhold judgment till reading all chapters.

12) Chapter 10 is titled "A Jailhouse Informant." If that chapter comes in as strong as its title suggests, this incremental retelling of a well-known story could be....worth it! Think about it–if the last chapters of this beast contain a few reportorial gems, the Post will have solved perhaps the hottest cold case in the country. That is the only justification for doing the series. Don't believe Leen for a second when he says that the story is actually an "accountability" series about lapses in police work and about the role of pack media in a high-profile killing. Sure, those may be components of the story but let's not pretend that there's some greater, more noble calling here. At least not in the first nine chapters. As for the rest, you know what to withhold.

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  • Reid

    I hate it when media outlets engage in sensationalistic reporting but then try to cover their tracks by claiming that they were just being "meta".

  • http://www.farmfreshmeat.com Jamie

    I am not denying that the Post (and media in general) devotes more attention to crimes involving white people than black people. But Pierre's charge that this is racist is patently absurd.

    Take race out of the equation for a minute. What's more interesting: the unsolved murder of a Congressional intern who was banging her boss and may, in fact, have been killed by her boss, or the murder of someone you've never heard of in a gang crime in circumstances that happen almost daily?

    What's more interesting, the murder of a New York Times reporter in Northwest, or the murder of an unknown in Southeast? Which is more common?

    What's more interesting, a high-profile area blogger being mugged, or me being mugged? Guess what. I'm white. It didn't make the papers when I got mugged.

    I can assure you if Chandra Levy had been black there would have been as much, if not more, coverage. While I personally think the current Chandra Levy piece is stupid, it's hardly racist. If it sells papers, then fine - they're just giving the public what they want. It may be lame journalism but it's not racist.

  • edwardallen

    Hooray for Pierre, and I couldn't agree more. If we are going to dig up and rehash sensational old unsolved murders, what about the Beltway Bandit spree that preoccupied Washington in the 1970's? And, as Pierre points out, there are murders on Washington's streets that get barely a mention in the newspaper. It is deliberate, it is demeaning, and it is racist. I have read 7 of the 12-parts of the Chandra series that have been released, and so I cannot reach any conclusion except to say the bodice-ripping cheap dime-store style of writing has not won this one reader over. Did I go to sleep when the Washington Post announced it adopted some trendy "new journalism" form of reporting. If so, count me as an extreme skeptic.

  • RA

    I suspect we are getting one investigation in 12 installments merely as a marketing effort and justification for time spent. Except it's self-defeating: the biggest problem with the story is that it indeed arrived in 12 little piles. Complaints such as Pierre's and others' likely could have been avoided - and a service to brevity done - with the rolling out of one (1)great piece.

  • http://undercoverblackman.blogspot.com Undercover Black Man

    Why do I get the feeling that if the Washington Post started devoting massive resources to highlighting the fact that black people commit more than half of all murders in the U.S., he might fancy that a tad racist as well?

  • edwardallen

    P.S. Let me tell you the end: Police were convinced it was Ingmar Guandique who did it, but they didn't have the evidence prosecutors said necessary to prove it at a trial. He wanted her Walkman. Guandique was imprisoned for 10 years on stalking and assault charges involving the other women, but let out after serving 4 years, put on a plane and deported back to Guatemala. There he was implicated in a break-in and disappeared under mysterious circumstances.

  • Gannett Prisoner

    Good thing Mr. Pierre doesn't work for Gannett. He'd be fired for insubordination for making those comments.

    Especially after they got out.

  • tim

    To me, they've either solved the crime or they haven't. We've known for years that the cops screwed up.

  • Kevin Beane

    Pierre says the series is "racist at its core" but in fact it is "capitalist at its core." The people that buy the products from the advertisters the Post can charge the most for - which story do you think THEY are more interested in?

  • Big Mike

    The Post didn't cause this. We did. The Post isn't ramming Chandra down our throats against our will. This city, and large parts of the country, were fascinated by this story when it broke. It's ridiculous for us to pretend that this is being foisted on us. Were we fascinated by this because she was white and banging a Congressman? Yes. Does that make us maybe a little prejudice, maybe a little stupid, and maybe too easily dragged into a sensationalized mess? Yes. Do all of the DC area media outlets need to do a better job of telling the story of the violence that's still all too pervasive? Of course. But none of that means a tragedy and the subsequent ineptitude that kept people from solving it should be left undisturbed.

  • david hlmberg

    Mike: I'm a writer in NY and I covered the Levy case for The Village Voice (although my story never made the paper.) Anyway, I'm still hung up on the case and have been reading the series and the responses, and yours is the single smartest, best response so far. You win the Chandra Reader Sweepstakes as far as I'm concerned.

    David Holmberg

  • JM

    Several random thoughts:

    --Did the Post not just devote a huge series in the past year or so on what it means to be black in America today?
    --Did they not devote a lot of coverage to the killing of a young black boy who allegedly stole a police officer's bike?
    --Does Robert Pierre presume that Post editors sit around at the news meeting, ask about the city's latest killings and then say, "Eh. What color is he? Black? Let's brief it." Race is often not apparent when murders are reported, and thus it would be hard to say Post editors are racist in how they handle coverage. The only thing that is apparent are scant details in which the victim has a lenghty criminal record and appears to have been targeted, i.e., a driveby.
    --There seems to be a primary factor that determines how much coverage a murder receives, and it's not race. It's whether the victim was a random target, or whether s/he appeared to have done something to contribute to his/her death. Regardless of race, a victim who is randomly killed in a public park is going to receive more attention because it's naturally going to cause the reader to say, "that could have been me."
    --To ask whether editors, and newspapers in general, devote more coverage to white victims than blacks is a legitimate question. But to call Post editors "racist" because they are reporting at length on the mysterious murder of a congressional intern whose congressman was a suspect -- a murder that riveted the nation and the world -- is not only unfair to editors, it's unfair to the debate on race. It does not contribute to the debate, but rather stokes the fire and puts people on the defensive.

  • creative loafer

    The Post just got WTF pwnd!!!1!

  • http://NotionsCapital.com Mike Licht

    In light of on-going newsroom staff reductions, Post reporters Sari Horwitz, Scott Higham and Sylvia Moreno are using the Chandra Levy series to audition for jobs on 20/20, Dateline NBC, and other Unsolved-Murders-of-Pretty-Young-White-Girls TV programs.

  • R. Ford Mashburn

    Lets say that the WP did heed the cries of racism, and actually did devote similar efforts to the hundreds of murders of young black men in DC. What would be the result?
    Blame for the mostly Black police? The City Council? The Mayor?
    Would this series simply reinforce the stereotype of young black male criminals and thugs in DC neighborhoods? Would that be ...... (wait for it) ...... RACIST?!
    You bet Robert Pierre would characterize it that way.

  • davisull

    No one reads the paper anymore, except for the 673,000 copies reported sold daily. That's still a heck of a lot of paper to throw onto 15th Street.

  • Smiling Jack

    I like the series. It's not the best I've ever read. I think they cut it up into 12 parts because with all of the cutbacks at the paper they didn't have the space (newsprint) to fit it into four parts.

    I would like to see Mr. Pierre's proposal for an investigation into the murders of black men, however. Surely, he wouldn't be critical unless he had something in mind.

  • thefrontpage

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    THE DEATH OF JIMMY HOFFA!!!

    WE SPENT 20 YEARS AND INTERVIEWED 1,947 PEOPLE, INCLUDING MANY OF JIMMY HOFFA'S RELATIVES, UNION PEOPLE, MOB PEOPLE, AND MOST OF THE PEOPLE WHO EVER ATE AT THAT DINER, AS WELL AS DANNY DE VITO AND JACK NICHOLSON, WHO OFFER STARTLING NEW INSIGHTS ON THE MYSTERIOUS MURDER!

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    UNFOLDING IN SHORT SEGMENTS WITH NO NEW INFORMATION IN 27 PARTS THROUGHOUT THE REST OF THE YEAR, SO YOU'LL CONTINUE BUYING PAPERS EVEN THOUGH THERE'S NOTHING NEW TO READ OR LEARN ABOUT THIS OLD, TIRED CASE!

    THE DEATH OF JIMMY HOFFA!!!

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  • RealCalGal

    I could not even get through the first installment. TWELVE!! Give me a break. This is another in the apparently never-ending series of fascinations with individual murders. I just don't get it. Especially a STALE individual murder.

  • http://Google brkdckdwg

    THIS IS EITHER THE CLASSIC PERILS OF PAULINE{WITH MS LEVY REPRESENTING ALL MURDER VICTIMS}{WITHOUT THE OIL CAN HARRY'S CHARACTER'S IDENITY KNOWN }CLIFF HANGER APPROACH TO INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING MEANT TO KEEP READERS CAUGHT UP IN THE CASE[ OUT OF SIGHT OUT OF MIND} UNTIL A HERO OR HEROINE COMES FORWARD WITH INFORMATION ABOUT HER CASE OR ANY OF THE OTHER UNSOLVED CASES [THAT EVEN IF TO LATE TO RESCUE MS LEVY OR THE OTHER VICTIMS}THAT COULD HELP BRING THE DASTERLY SCROUNDREL[S]TO JUSTICE||| OR IT COULD BE THAT THE PAPER IS BIAS AND THAT MINORITY MURDERS ARE A DIME A DOZEN AND NOT OF INTREST TO THE MAJORITY OF IT'S READING PUBLIC WHO MIGHT HAVE MORE IN COMMON AND THUS MORE EMPATHY FOR A WHITE VICTIM{THERE BUT FOR THE GRACE OF....GO I}AND I TEND NOT TO GIVE THE FAIR AND BALANCED BENEFIT TO THE MEDIA

  • http://www.jugglinginthedark.blogspot.com Woody Hinkle

    I can't understand the point of running this thing. I have to say I wondered at the time why the post spent so much space on the series about what it's like to be black in America, but I do tend to agree with those who wonder why the unsolved murder of a white girl from California gets so much space when the unsolved murders of dozens of locals (black, white, hispanic and asian) go unreported or lightly reported.

    I have to confess, I'm reading it. But every time I hate myself for it. TWELVE?

    Besides, it's poorly written. Every trite cliche you can imagine is in there. Are the three writers interns?

  • Vincent

    He has got a point -- just as the Central Park jogging case would have received little or no publicity had the victim not been a stockbroker and Yale graduate.

  • Mike

    For heaven's sake, people! Must I be the only one to point out that its and ELECTION year? Ergo, it is time to trot out some moldy Republican scandal to distract the public from the do-nothing Democratic Congress. Remember Mark Foley from the last election cycle? He went from gay guy trying to cruise some pages (an every day occurance in DC, folks), to public enemy #1 because it was an election year. Obviously Mr. Pierre did NOT get the memo.

  • Brian

    the 200 black men being murdered in DC weren't having affairs with members of Congress.

  • Pedro

    I've been wondering whether there'd be so much criticism if the Post had taken this 12-parter and made it one big simple Sunday magazine story in August? My guess is the soap opera-like teasing of each next installment, spread out over more than a week, has turned the whole thing into smelling like a desperate gimmick in a much-confused, suffering industry.

  • Frederich

    I got a laugh out of your "let's reserve judgment" gag, thanks. In the reporters' online chat session from Monday, where they skipped over four different questions with the reply, "Keep reading!" They tried to be jovial about it, but it's somehow irritating instead.

    That's the problem with the series format, I think. It's not that 12 days is a long time -- it's that we feel we're being played for page views, PT Barnum-style.

    If you've got something crucial to tell me, then for heaven's sake *tell* me. If you don't, then why spread it out over 12 days?

  • Ernest

    Accusations of racism is a patent nonsense.

    Black or white, a simple murder will produce no fuss in the media. There has to be a juicy stuff involving the rich &powerful. Therefore, to be in the papers, as an alternative to leading a life of crime on the streets, young black males should try to more actively ingratiate themselves in the corridors of power.

  • lou

    Uh, Mike, you do realize Condit was a dem?

  • Lou

    Lou:
    You may well believe that Condit was a Democrat, but the AP says otherwise:

    http://ap.google.com/article/ALeqM5jh864GVtywpaasgoeAFNJvkmEzJQD91PTDJ85

    Strange how that happens, huh. Sort of like how a certain Democratic vice-presidential candidate becomes a non-person once he becomes an embarassment! Sort of like how Larry Craig or Mark Foley become a national news story when THEY become an embarassment! No bias here folks. Perish the thought.

  • Mark

    Chandra Levy was wealthy, white, young, and a Likudnik.

    The Washington Post, with all of its veteran talent (Tony Kornballer, who has no skills, excluded) having taken the buyouts, finds itself left with a bunch of Silver Spoon Ivy League alums who couldn't cover a house fire in a small Maryland town and grew up on Beverly Hills 90210.

    So The Post gives us Soap Opera Journalism, a healthy mix of marketing, tired repetition, titillation, and a 12-part visit to the proctologist.

    The Post editorial side fills lots of space with its limited staff. The Post sales staff rakes in the bucks from the Entertainment Last Night crowd. The Levy family, Likud, AIPAC, Heritage, and AEI rejoice.

    And Debby Howell runs for the hills.

  • http://tinatrent.com Tina Trent

    What selective outrage and faux "courage." I and millions of other raped, tortured and murdered women who happen to be white are routinely, entirely ignored by the media, and Robert Pierre owes us an apology when and if he calms down. What the media actually loves to do is run with stories where crimes appear to be committed by non-minority assailants so they can avoid insinuations of racism when they choose to dabble in sensationalism (let's hear some courageous reporters acknowledge those newsroom conversations), or crimes committed by husbands or famous people, and, always, crimes committed against young, attractive victims who are thus exposed to post-rape or even postmortem sexualization through the very fact of their victimization. Fascination in the form of column inches isn't affection -- it's often just ugly, gleeful fetish, exercised without restraint when concerns about being accused of highlighting black pathology are removed from the mix because the victim is white. See, for example, the New York Times' grotesque decision to allow Anemona Hartocollis turn its coverage of a rape-and-torture trial into breathless, Sex-in-the-City titillation, complete with sexually suggestive photos of the burned woman's shoes. If this type of thing were done to black female sex crime victims, there would (VERY appropriately) be outrage -- not that any reporter or editor would allow it in the first place. But when the victim is white, she can often expect to be re-victimized in the news for the very reason that she is a member of one group it is acceptable to scapegoat -- white female crime victims. Because of the color of her skin, she may be further degraded by people like Pierre who label her racist-by-proxy, or just racist. Go to bed raped, wake up a symbol of the Klan to histrionic, self-righteous journalists. It's a sick little system and a horribly damaging one, particularly because people like Pierre actually imagine they are "speaking truth to power," when they are the ones perpetuating racism. As someone directly on the receiving end of Pierre's ignorant tirade, simply because I was unfortunate enough to be white while raped, I think I speak for many victims when I say I will not take it anymore. Feel -- terrifically -- free to contact me, one of those people you have accused of personally benefitting from racism, to discuss this further, Mr. Pierre, if you have the integrity to do so. Enough is enough.

  • Mark

    "I and millions of other raped, tortured and murdered women who happen to be white are routinely, entirely ignored by the media..."

    Tina,

    You were murdered?

    Then how did you manage to type the above post? You're dead. By your own admission. Aren't you?

    Or are you blogging to us from the Great Beyond? The Conservatives and Likudniks will rejoice. Then, of course, Pastor John Hagee will announce full scale Armageddon.

    Or were you brought back to life through genetic cloning? The Conservatives and Likudniks will be mighty angry. Then, of course, Hagee won't come after you; instead, Dr. Bill "Just The Pictures Please" Frist will handle your case.

    Rape is NOTHING about which to joke. Call Lorena Bobbitt for each and every rapist. With rapists, I do not negotiate.

    But grammatical mutilation and nonsensical statements deserve each and every guffaw and chortle possible. With sloppy writers, I offer no sympathy and, instead, favor a swift kick in your proofreader.

  • Ted Scheinman

    Mark,

    That was pretty tasteless.

    ~Ted

  • Mark

    Teddy,

    Are you suggesting that people should give the victims of rape, a heinous crime to be sure, a pass on any and all nonsensical writing and base grammatical errors?

    Or should we simply offer such a pass to the victims of those raped merely for their white-collar crimes? Their felonies? Their misdemeanors?

    And how, may I ask, does The Washington Post's overly dramatic, overblown 12-part series on a rich, attractive, connected, white Likudnik in any way, shape, or form parallel the heinous crime of rape in D.C.?

    Wasn't Chandra Levy murdered? Or is murder now rape? Or rape now murder?

    Or does the proper and correct identification of the crime matter when it involves a wealthy, attractive, connected, white Likudnik?

    Perhaps, and we're just blogging on the 'Net here, the white, wealthy, connected, attractive Likdunik was murdered by a Nazi? Or maybe the planner of Barack Obama's trip to Germany? After all, everyone knows about Likudniks and Germany. Not to mention African-Americans and Mobile. And D.C. pedestrians and Conservative Corvette driver Bob Novak.

    The possibilities for endless victimization and over-exploitation here are just without boundaries!

    Meanwhile, the Post continues to decline in quality, but take heart: the paper's hierarchy is doing all it can to protect the wealthy, attractive, white, connected Likudniks who butcher the English language.

    Perhaps you have other suggestions. I'm all eyes. Just try to make some sense, son. And don't butcher the English language. Or whine about being a victim.

    Thank you.

  • Mark

    I like this Tina Trent.

    Not only is she is Professional Victim, but, if you clink on the link attached to her name, she's also a Shameless Self-Promoter!

    http://tinatrent.com/

    And from Dixie, no less, where the divorce rate far surpasses we heathens in the Evil Northeast, Beltway, and upper Midwest.

  • Gannett Escapee

    Gannett Prisoner Says:

    >>Good thing Mr. Pierre doesn’t work for Gannett. He’d be fired for insubordination for making those comments.

    Agreed. It speaks well of the Post (IMHO) that a reporter can make a principled argument against his employer's editorial judgment without fear of repercussions -- it's called freedom of speech, part of that whole First Amendment thing that allows the watchdog press to exist at all.

    (That Gannett would fire an outspoken employee for taking such a stance speaks volumes of their *own* views of the First Amendment, particularly vis-a-vis maximizing profits and retaining "yes people" who won't rock the boat one way or the other. But that's neither here nor there.)

  • Mark

    Gannett is an investment, a hedge fund with color photography and fancy graphics.

    Gannett has little, if any, interest in journalism.

  • JCH

    Pierre just doesn't understand journalism today apparently...has he ever seen The Today Show/ Dateline/20/20/Fox News??? These stories are white-hot, pardon the pun, and they are covered with breathless urgency like our national security depended on it. It's a fact of life the sensationalistic stuff is going to get play. Everyone says it's what the people wants so it's what they get. I guess it's true.

  • teebee

    There are countless untold stories about unsolved missing and/or dead individuals in this city. Not unlike media practices nationwide, the Post's fixation is on a white victim. I only bothered to read a few paragraphs of the first installment. The coverage was excessive and the writing was embellished--especially the physical attributes of Levy and Condit---to read like a Harlequin novel.

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  • Nietzschean

    How many people have heard of the Zebra Killings of the San Francisco Area back in the mid-70's? Why hasn't a movie been made about that sensational case? (for the same reason there's been no Alger Hiss-Whittaker Chambers case--not pc). The fact is, even if the Post devoted a never-ending series of stories on black murder victims, they'd be slammed byt he same people for participating in "the destruction of the black male image" in our culture, since all of these people will have been killed by black males. And when the media does get a hold of the PC case of its dreams (for example, the Duke Lacrosse "rape" case) it goes batshit crazy.

...