Posts Tagged ‘Terri Weifenbach’

Reviewed: Terri Weifenbach at the Leica Store

Is going back to your artistic roots a sign of confidence, or a lack of it? Terri Weifenbach’s solo exhibit at D.C.’s Leica store poses this thorny question.
In the Leica exhibit, Weifenbach showcases works that echo her circa-2001 technique of photographing natural scenes in bright, spring-like colors and—most notably—her creative use of focus. The exhibit [...]

The Best Images of 2012

Sometimes one image is enough to carry an exhibit. Here are my picks for the Top 10 images that appeared in photographic exhibits in D.C. in 2012.
1. Frank Hallam Day, ship hull images, Addison/Ripley Gallery
It’s difficult to choose the better of Day’s two photographs of ship hulls in “Waterline,” an exhibit loosely organized around the [...]

Reviewed: Ken D. Ashton, Kate MacDonnell, and Terri Weifenbach at Civilian Art Projects

The title “Time & Land” describes with precision this exhibit of photographic works by Ken D. Ashton, Kate MacDonnell, and Terri Weifenbach at Civilian Art Projects: The artists explore, in their own way, the passage of time on the land. MacDonnell’s works are hobbled by needlessly claustrophobic wood frames and an indifferent color palette, but her [...]

Reviewed: Terri Weifenbach, Trevor Young, and Patrick McDonough at Civilian Art Projects

Terri Weifenbach is a photographer who specializes in understated woodsy scenes; Trevor Young is a painter whose stark, moody works in oil focus on heavy infrastructure. Aside from being accomplished D.C. artists, they are not the most obvious pairing, but they are showing jointly at Civilian Art Projects. Weifenbach’s newest work continues her interest in [...]

Now on View: “Bernhard Fuchs: Roads and Paths” at Goethe-Institut

Bernhard Fuchs, a photographer now working in Dusseldorf, Germany, intensively documented the landscapes surrounding his native Helfenberg, Austria, for a series of 11-by-11-inch color prints now making its American debut. Fuchs’ photographs bear some resemblance to the unpopulated woodland imagery of Terri Weifenbach recently shown in D.C. But whereas Wiefenbach’s scattershot panorama of dull green-and-beige [...]

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