Posts Tagged ‘Smithsonian American Art Museum’

We’re Co-Presenting a Free Show Tonight, and You Should Come

Paint Branch and The Walking Sticks are playing the Luce Foundation Center (inside the Smithsonian American Art Museum) tonight. Washington City Paper is co-presenting the concert with the museum. Here are 10 reasons you should come:
1. Both of those bands were among Washington City Paper's favorite music in 2013
2. The show is free
3. "American Cool" opens today [...]

Come to Our Luce Unplugged Show With Paint Branch and The Walking Sticks

Back in December 2011, Title Tracks frontman John Davis played an intimate set in the Luce Foundation Center at the Smithsonian American Art Museum as part of its regular Luce Unplugged series. Toward the end of the set, Davis brought up his old bandmate from Q and Not U, Chris Richards—now the pop critic at the Washington Post—and the pair played some [...]

The Art of the Steal: A Brief History of Museum Theft in D.C.

It’s no theft of the Mona Lisa, but the tale of the “flea market” Renoir was one of the best art-theft stories the D.C. area has seen in years—made irresistible by the fishy claims of a local woman who, saying she paid $7 for Renoir’s “On the Shore of the Seine” at a flea market [...]

The Best Photographic Images of 2013

The best photographic images in D.C. museums and galleries this year offered a memorable confluence of visual elements, engaged in conceptual experimentation, and made clever use of atypical materials and techniques. They were not, in other words, antiquated. But among my five favorites, only one was made in 2013.
The others were from 1947, 1956, 1973, [...]

You! Come to Our Show With Janel and Anthony and Teen Mom at the American Art Museum

Here we are, a couple of days from the weekend, and you're looking for some musical happy-hour plans—good. On Friday, Washington City Paper is collaborating with the Smithsonian American Art Museum's Luce Foundation Center (not for the first time!) on this month's installment of the Luce Unplugged series. For the event, we picked two of our favorite [...]

Reviewed: “Landscapes In Passing” at the Smithsonian American Art Museum

The open road is so quintessentially American that it verges on cliché. The Smithsonian American Art Museum exhibit "Landscapes In Passing" follows this well-traveled route, with mixed results.
The exhibit features works by three photographers—Robbert Flick, Elaine Mayes and Steve Fitch—each of whom documented America's landscape as seen from the automobile in the 1970s and early [...]

Reviewed: “A Democracy of Images” at the Smithsonian American Art Museum

As it is for any exhibit that seeks to encapsulate an entire nation’s photographic culture, organization and scope pose a challenge for "A Democracy of Images: The Smithsonian American Art Museum," an exhibit that celebrates the 30th anniversary of the museum's photography collection.
To its credit, though, "A Democracy of Images" takes its "democratic" mandate pretty [...]

Listen to a New America Hearts Song (Then Come See Them Tonight at the American Art Museum)

You are coming to the show we helped put together at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, aren't you? This evening's free Luce Unplugged showcase features sets from Lyriciss, More Humans, and America Hearts—plus, for the first hour, some free beer samples from Port City Brewing. Very cool.
Also cool: This new song that America Hearts sent us [...]

Hey! Come to Our Show at the Smithsonian American Art Museum on Friday

Hey, Mr./Ms. Educated Concertgoer. Need some early evening plans for Friday? Read on.
You'll recall that every month, the Luce Foundation Center hosts intimate concerts in its gorgeous space on the third floor of the American Art Museum. Last September, we helped plan a Luce Unplugged show featuring three of Arts Desk's favorite D.C. acts: Kokayi, [...]

Reviewed: “Pictures In the Parlor” at the Smithsonian American Art Museum

The Smithsonian American Art Museum exhibition "Pictures in the Parlor" is a bit of an oddity. Nominally a photography show, it spotlights "decorative images" created between the 1840s and the 1930s—primarily portraits of family members—that were displayed in homes "to convey the values, aspirations, and achievements of their owners." The exhibit succeeds in rescuing a long-lived, [...]