Posts Tagged ‘signature theatre’

Arts Roundup: Hirshhorn Shakeup Edition

After an inconclusive Hirshhorn vote on the Bloomberg Balloon/Bubble, Hirshhorn Director Richard Koshalek resigns. [Arts Desk]
Phil Kennicott's reaction: "If [Smithsonian Secretary G. Wayne] Clough votes down the Bubble, it will send a clear and chilling message to other Smithsonian entities and to anyone who is courted to replace Koshalek." [Post]
Columnist John Kelly makes a D.C. [...]

Arts Roundup: Theater Bailout Edition

Odd: The Arlington County Board gives Signature Theatre a $250,000 grant to cover its outstanding tax debts. [ARLnow]
Daft Punk's Random Access Memories is so-so—but sounds better at U Street Music Hall, writes Chris Richards. [Post]
What to look forward to at this year's Capital Fringe: more beer, barbecue sandwiches, cardboard art [Post]

ToDo ToDay: Company at Signature Theatre and a Daft Punk Listening Party

For its current production of Company, Sondheim's musical tribute to thirtysomething urban dwellers, Signature Theatre has dug deep into its own company: All of the actors have performed in at least two previous productions with the Arlington theater. A dark musical comedy about the woes of adult relationships might hit too close to home, [...]

Arts Roundup: The Real Housewives of Benning Road Edition

Introducing The Real Housewives of Benning Road. [TMOTTGoGo]
Alamo Drafthouse is searching for three new D.C.-area locations. [Washington Business Journal]
Theater J dedicates a performance to deceased D.C. Jewish Community Center parking-lot attendant Desmond Obamogie. [Theater J]
Record Store Day: a very mixed blessing for local record shops. [Post]
Michael Kahn returns to Signature Theatre for the first time in two [...]

Signature, Studio, and MetroStage Lead Winners at Helen Hayes Awards

Folger Theatre's The Taming of the Shrew and Signature Theatre's Dreamgirls took home the big two prizes at last night's Helen Hayes Awards, winning statues for outstanding resident play and outstanding resident musical, respectively. Signature's good night didn't stop there: The Shirlington-based playhouse won three more statues—two others for Dreamgirls, and the Charles MacArthur Award [...]

ToDo ToDay: “Palaces for the People” and Elephants Walking Around

They look striking from the outside, it’s true. But the reason many of the nation’s Beaux-Arts landmarks, including Grand Central Terminal and Carnegie Hall, are so beloved is the tile and mortar work of Rafael Guastavino Sr. The Spanish builder's tile-arch signature can be found in D.C. in the U.S. Supreme Court and the National [...]

Arts Roundup: Signature Switcheroo Edition

Now there's a reason for Signature Theatre's cancelation of Crimes of the Heart: Two cast members left for personal reasons. [Post]
Woolly Mammoth announces its 34th season. [Post]
All the President's Men Revisited screening scheduled at Newseum for April 18; panel includes Bob Woodward, Carl Bernstein, Robert Redford, Rachel Maddow, Jill Abramson, and other various celebrities and big-name [...]

Arts Roundup: The Mayor Does Austin Edition

Mayor Vincent Gray goes to SXSW... [Post]
...and DCist has some ideas for his itinerary. [DCist]
Pitchfork hands Deathfix's debut a respectable 6.4 rating. [Pitchfork]
Signature Theatre cans Crimes of the Heart, swaps in The Last Five Years. [D.C. Theatre Scene]
From the archives: Washington City Paper's coverage of go-go in the 1980s [Unveiled]
Gettysburg Address to be displayed at [...]

Arts Roundup: Peak Bloom Edition

The cherry blossoms are expected to peak March 26-30. [Post]
Signature Theatre announces its 2013-14 season. [Post]
The new Hill Center Poetry Series comes to the Old Naval Hospital. [Post]
H&M takes over Barnes & Noble's old space at Union Station. [Washington Business Journal]
Eliminated this week, North Potomac native Gurpreet Singh Sarin was the first Sikh contestant on [...]

Shakespeare’s R&J at Signature Theatre, Reviewed

The less theater you’ve seen in D.C. in recent years, the fresher you may find Shakespeare’s R&J, Joe Calarco’s four-man retelling of the Bard’s tragedy—set not in ancient fair Verona but in the halls of a Catholic boarding school, where a quartet of male students mounts the play late at night, playing all the parts. [...]

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