Posts Tagged ‘graphic novels’

Illustrator Brian Biggs on Writer’s Block Remedies, Paying the Bills, and the Future of Publishing

"If books go away in favor of digital formats, will I still be able to find an audience and make a living?"

Meet a Local Cartoonist: A Chat With G.E. Gallas

G.E. Gallas is a multimedia creator who is currently raising funds to make her short film Death Is No Bad Friend, about Robert Louis Stevenson. She's also working on two web comics, and has illustrated a new young adult book, Scared Stiff: Everything You Need to Know About 50 Famous Phobias. Recovering from emergency gall bladder surgery, [...]

Meet a Semilocal Cartoonist: A Chat with Ben Hatke

Ben Hatke actually lives in Front Royal, Va., but we'll call him local: He does book signings here, most recently at the Capicons convention and Big Planet Comics. The classically trained artist with an infectious grin works well with kids—at his Politics & Prose talk for his first book, he ended it with a backflip, [...]

Meet a Local Cartoonist: A Chat with Mal Jones

Mal Jones is a local web cartoonist and member of the DC Conspiracy whose story about the War of 1812, " Burn, Washington, Burn," appears in the District Comics anthology. His artwork also appears regularly in the free Magic Bullet comics newspaper.
For most of 2012, he's been working on The Giant War web comic, which [...]

Meet a Local Cartoonist: A Chat with Gordon Harris

Gordon Harris has recently published his first graphic novel, Pedestrian, which he says is “an original full-color post-apocalyptic graphic novel without zombies or vampires.” His press release describes the book’s plot as “Ray, the pedestrian, wanders the post-apocalyptic suburbs and discovers a mysterious package, an elaborate tree house, and carrier pigeons. He meets [...]

International Ink: A Summer Comics Gift List

Fine, so it's way too early to think about the holidays, but summer usually requires some gift-giving. Take the opportunity to convert people to Team Comics by giving them a cartoon book.
For the high school or college graduate, Casey Scieszka and Steven Weinberg's To Timbuktu: Nine Countries, Two People, One True Story (Roaring Press, $20) [...]

International Ink: France, Canada, England, New York, and New Haven

Jacques Tardi's Adèle Blanc-Sec is a longtime favorite French anti-heroine, appearing first in comic books in 1972. She's never quite broken into the English-language market, although four books appeared in English the 1990s. Now in the wake of a movie adaptation appearing in France, Fantagraphics publisher Kim Thompson has translated her first two stories anew. [...]

International Ink: Think Holiday Thoughts

Many comic art books released this fall are, naturally, suitable as gifts...whether that's for someone else or yourself is up to you. Here's a few that may be of interest.
How to Understand Israel in 60 Days or Less (Vertigo, $24.99) is American Jew Sarah Glidden's travelogue about her "Birthright Israel" tour of the country. Religiously [...]

International Ink: Pirates, Ghosts, and Wookies, Oh My!

Books for review have been piling up again, but the fall con schedule has been working against me. Here's some quick hits of material I've read recently.
Set to Sea by Drew Weing (Fantagraphics, $16.99) is a graphic novel largely because there's nothing else to call these things yet. The book is about 150 pages long, [...]

Reviewed: Krazy & Ignatz in Tiger Tea by George Herriman

Calvin and Hobbes creator Bill Watterson thought that George Herriman’s work was peerless. “Krazy Kat is a completely unique strip,” Watterson told Honk magazine. “I think it’s the best comic strip ever drawn…I marvel at it because it’s beyond duplication. It’s like trying to paint a sunrise—you’re better off not even trying.” Watterson even paid [...]

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