Posts Tagged ‘Eugene O’Neill’

In Their Eyes, the Light of a Dawning Madness Is Shining: Condensed Stage Directions of Eugene O’Neill, Reviewed

Watchmen author Alan Moore, whom many regard as the most fertile mind ever to devote itself to writing comic books, used to drive artists batty with his hyper-detailed descriptions of the artwork, enumerating the precise contents of each panel he wanted to see on the page in nigh-impossible-to-draw detail.
In this, Moore is a spiritual descendant [...]

This Week in WCP Arts: Filmfest D.C., Whit Stillman, Eugene O’Neill

On the cover of this week's Washington City Paper is our massive look at Filmfest D.C., which this year has placed an emphasis on comedy (and revealed something about itself in the process). Tricia Olszewski leads the arts section with reviews of films about preppy seclusion and the Babylon of geekdom: Damsels in Distress and [...]

This Week in WCP Arts: Howard Theatre, Listen Local First, chickfactor

Leading this week's Washington City Paper is sage advice from Ally Schweitzer and Michael J. West on how to not screw up the Howard Theatre, the newly restored historic venue that reopens this month. Also in the feature well, I have an essay in which I untangle the contradictions of supporting arts scenes simply because [...]

This Week in WCP Arts: Mike Daisey, Video Games, Audrey Tautou

Chris Klimek leads this week's arts section with his defense of embattled monologist Mike Daisey, whose The Agony of the Ecstasy of Steve Jobs will return to Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company this summer, even though Daisey lied about some of its scenes' veracity to producers of This American Life. John Anderson reviews the Smithsonian American [...]

Open Season: Shakespeare Theatre Company

In the world of theater marketing, successfully rolling out your season is an art. Sell it with a strong hook, and you can build serious buzz for your upcoming slate of plays and programming. But for those of us who cover theater, season announcements can get pretty old pretty quickly. In order to stay interested, [...]

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