Posts Tagged ‘Civilian Art Projects’

What Is the Role of Art in the Wake of Tragedy?

The Economist gave the United States a whole weekend to mourn the victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary massacre before telling the entire nation to suck it up. "Those of us who view the events remotely ... unless we start to evince a newfound appetite for gun-control measures to prevent future mass slayings, are doing little [...]

Reviewed: Avi Gupta and Judy Jashinsky at Civilian Art Projects

The photographs in Avi Gupta’s exhibit at Civilian Art Projects tend to be domestic in nature – images taken in bedrooms, living rooms and back yards. But their lack of specificity lends a sense of universality.
Gupta, a D.C.-based photographer, has a special affinity for creased fabrics. He offers depictions of unmade beds, draped shirts, and [...]

Reviewed: Frank DiPerna and Dan Tague at Civilian Art Projects

Frank DiPerna’s exhibit at Civilian Art Projects is all about flatness, both real and contrived. DiPerna, a photographer and professor at the Corcoran College of Art and Design, has traveled the globe documenting murals and other wall surfaces, from a gate spray-painted with skulls in Mexico to a Dolce & Gabbana ad on a beach [...]

Reviewed: Shamus Ian Fatzinger, Bridget Sue Lambert, and Richard Chartier at Civilian Art Projects

Shamus Ian Fatzinger found his artistic destiny in a forgotten cardboard box: dozens of scuffed and largely unprinted negatives, in both the standard 35 mm and cheap 110 format, documenting his young parents’ move west from New Jersey to New Mexico, chasing the dream of riches from uranium mining. It’s a 1970s working-class demimonde of [...]

Reviewed: Ken D. Ashton, Kate MacDonnell, and Terri Weifenbach at Civilian Art Projects

The title “Time & Land” describes with precision this exhibit of photographic works by Ken D. Ashton, Kate MacDonnell, and Terri Weifenbach at Civilian Art Projects: The artists explore, in their own way, the passage of time on the land. MacDonnell’s works are hobbled by needlessly claustrophobic wood frames and an indifferent color palette, but her [...]

Reviewed: Colby Caldwell at Hemphill Fine Arts and Civilian Art Projects

The prolific and stylistically restless D.C.-based artist Colby Caldwell is not only mounting two simultaneous exhibits—at Hemphill Fine Arts and Civilian Art Projects—but the exhibits feature four distinct bodies of work, each with a varied take on photography. Several works (including the one below) are new examples from Caldwell’s decade-old series “How to Survive Your [...]

Don’t Be Bored: Russian Barons and Italian Punx

A Russian billionaire! Money laundering! Oil squandering! A nation hung up on Soviet-era political power games! Khodorkovsky is German director Cyril Tuschi’s largely flattering account of Mikhail Khodorkovsky—once the richest oligarch in Russia, but now just a guy who’s done time in Siberian and Finnish work camps. Khodorkovsky’s crimes? Fraud, tax evasion, money laundering, and oil [...]

Corcoran Alumni Launch Tom Green Benefit Drive

Here's a heart-warmer: Alumni at the Corcoran College of Art + Design have launched a funding drive to purchase a painting by D.C. artist Tom Green, who was diagnosed with Lou Gehrig's disease. The alumni foundation intends to present the work to the Corcoran for its permanent collection.
In 2010, the American University Museum at the [...]

Reviewed: Terri Weifenbach, Trevor Young, and Patrick McDonough at Civilian Art Projects

Terri Weifenbach is a photographer who specializes in understated woodsy scenes; Trevor Young is a painter whose stark, moody works in oil focus on heavy infrastructure. Aside from being accomplished D.C. artists, they are not the most obvious pairing, but they are showing jointly at Civilian Art Projects. Weifenbach’s newest work continues her interest in [...]

Reviewed: Jason Falchook and Seth Adelsberger at Civilian Art Projects

The past decade of work by Jason Falchook—a Brooklyn-based photographer who trained at the Corcoran College of Art and Design—has been punctuated by somewhat disorienting compositions, often with a narrow field of focus and ground that seems to tilt at an angle away from the viewer. In Falchook's most recent exhibit, “Laying Tracks,” one can [...]

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