Author Archive for Matt Cohen

The Sleigher: Masked Intruder’s “Under the Mistletoe”

HO HO WHO: The four members of Madison, Wisc., pop-punk band Masked Intruder wear intimidating multicolored ski masks supposedly to hide their identities, but I suspect they don disguises to conceal an inconvenient truth: This is not a punk band at all! These dudes are a bunch of softies. That much is revealed in Masked [...]

Comedian Gilbert Gottfried: “All of the Curse Words Are Enjoyable To Me”

When I first picked up the phone to talk to Gilbert Gottfried, I was taken aback: The prolific comedian/actor/writer/outrageous personality sounds nothing like the infamous shrieky schtick he’s known for. Instead, he sounds something more like a cross between Diane Rehm and Perry Como. He speaks softly, slowly, and graciously, like a humble grandfather.
But make [...]

One Track Mind: No Paris, Cimmerian

Standout Track: No. 1, "(Deep) End," from Cimmerian, the simmering debut cassette from No Paris. The electronic avant-garde/experimental project comes from Woodley Park resident Sean Gray, 30, who runs the DIY labels Fan Death and Accidental Guest. Ambient and wordless, "(Deep) End" plays like a brooding, pulsating score, swelling to a climax that never comes.
Musical [...]

Skank and File: An Oral History of D.C. Ska

Strike up a conversation with 70 percent of this town’s 20- to 30-something punk rockers, and they’ll probably tell you they grew up with hardcore or emo. Talk to the other 30 percent, and they’ll say it was ska.
Most folks probably remember ska from the brief time when trumpet-toting dudes in plaid suits and pork-pie [...]

One Track Mind: Andy Bowen, The 26th Anniversary Edition

Standout Track: No. 6, “How We Lose This Thing,” a riff-heavy, lyrically aggressive pop song from the debut solo album of Southern Problems bassist and Brightwood Park resident Andy Bowen. The catchy tune tells of Bowen’s infuriating encounter with a “socially liberal, fiscally conservative” gay white guy at a party before it transitions into a [...]

Newseum Resorts to Archiving Fake News with Anchorman Exhibit

Though the Newseum—D.C.’s living monument to the history, culture, and legacy of journalism and media—has struggled to be kind of a big deal, the splashy fall show it announced today, “Anchorman: The Exhibit,” seems like an attempt to change that.
On Nov. 14, with the backing of Paramount Pictures, the museum will mount an exhibit dedicated [...]

Director Noah Baumbach on Frances Ha, Twentysomethings, and Great Pop Songs

Early in his career, Noah Baumbach made the delightfully wry film Kicking and Screaming, which followed a group of college buddies who go through a sort of existential crisis upon graduating college and spend the subsequent year loitering around campus instead of leaping into adulthood. It’s a terrifically personal mediation on, well, the same kind [...]

Five Reasons You Should Probably Avoid Star Trek Into Darkness

When it was announced that J.J. Abrams was to revive the storied but long-dead Star Trek franchise, the news was met with more skepticism than excitement. But the resulting 2009 film, Star Trek, not only managed to surpass expectations (which were, admittedly, pretty low), but it turned out to be one of the best blockbusters in [...]

Five Reasons You Should Probably See Iron Man 3

Summer doesn’t technically start until June 21st, but according to Hollywood, it starts today, with the release of the first potential blockbuster of the season, Iron Man 3.
Considering the sheer number of blockbusters released each summer (and this one is looking stacked), you may want to think hard on which ones are actually worth your [...]

Director Jeff Nichols on Fugazi, Southern Literature, and Mud

Jeff Nichols isn’t the type of director to make a light film. His first feature, 2007’s Shotgun Stories, a terse family drama about a blood feud between two sets of half brothers in rural Arkansas, became one of the most talked-about films of the year and established him as a fresh new voice in the [...]

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