Arts Desk

Longtime Adams Morgan Record Store Crooked Beat Is Closing

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It's a bit of a rough time for record stores in the D.C. area. Earlier this month, on the eve of Record Store Day, Joe's Record Paradise launched a crowdfunding campaign to help save the longtime Maryland store. Yesterday, Adams Morgan staple Crooked Beat announced that they'd be closing their currently location at the end of May, with plans to open a new location but no space confirmed yet. Read more Longtime Adams Morgan Record Store Crooked Beat Is Closing

To Do This Weekend: Maracuyeah 5 Year Anniversary, M. Ward, and The Thermals

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D.C.’s Maracuyeah DJ Collective will celebrate its fifth anniversary the way this team of female music spinners always has—with guest performers and DJs playing tropical dance music that Maracuyeah refers to as “Pan-Latin to the Future.” Maracuyeah—whose name combines the word maracuyá, a Peruvian and Colombian passion fruit, with a Colombian slang expression—will present sets by its own DJ Rat and Carmencha at the celebration, as well as ones from Oakland-based Panamanian rap act Los Rakas, Brooklyn-by-way-of-Panama-and-Puerto Rico DJ Bembona, and Venezuelan electro-pop artist MPeach. Read more >>> Bembona, MPeach, and Los Rakas perform at 10 p.m. at Judy’s Bar and Restaurant, 2212 14th St. NW. $15. maracuyeah.com. (Steve Kiviat)

EAT THIS

Georgetown Piano Bar is launching brunch with live piano music this weekend. The menu includes stuffed challah French toast, buttermilk biscuits with sausage and gravy, a quiche, and a panini. An entree plus bottomless mimosas and bloody marys goes for $25 with a two-hour limit. This brunch, however, is more for people who like to sleep in: It lasts from 1 to 5 p.m. every Saturday and Sunday. Georgetown Piano Bar, 3287 M St. NW. (202) 337-1871. georgetownpianobar.com. (Jessica Sidman)

OH AND ALSO

Friday: Quotidian Theatre begins performances of A Lesson From Aloes, Athol Fugard's drama about a white anti-apartheid activist and his friendship with a black man recently released from prison. 8 p.m. at 4508 Walsh St., Bethesda. $15–$30.

Friday: Canadian electronic band Bear Mountain brings its techno-influenced music to DC9 for an early show featuring opening act Young Empires. 7 p.m. at 1940 9th St. NW. $12. Read more To Do This Weekend: Maracuyeah 5 Year Anniversary, M. Ward, and The Thermals

Maracuyeah Celebrates Five Years of All-Inclusive, No-Bullshit Latin Dance Parties

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Kristy La Rat and DJ Mafe of Maracuyeah.

Five years ago, Kristy La Rat and DJ Mafe were in a car on their way to New York to interview and see Oakland-via-Panama rap duo Los Rakas, lamenting the fact that independent artists like that never made it to D.C. Inspired by the show’s energy, Kristy and Mafe decided they would start booking the artists they loved, and Maracuyeah was born. And as the DJs and organizers of Maracuyeah celebrate their fifth anniversary tonight, it’s only fitting that the show will be headlined by Los Rakas, the duo that started it all. Read more Maracuyeah Celebrates Five Years of All-Inclusive, No-Bullshit Latin Dance Parties

Green-Age Dream: As Broccoli City Fest Grows, So Does Its Commitment to Healthy Living

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Broccoli City founders, from left: Brandon McEachern, Darryl Perkins, Jermon Williams, and Marcus Allen.

Spring’s return also signals the beginning of festival season, a circuit that’s become better defined by the experience than the actual music.

At Coachella, an annual romp in the California desert, for example, the sounds are rivaled by the sights—mainly celebrity appearances and fashion. It’s all about the scene; the music is merely the soundtrack for the setting.

But since its inception, Broccoli City Festival has used music to lure people toward a greater purpose. It debuted in D.C. in 2013, billed as the District’s landmark Earth Day celebration, and was created by Broccoli City, a grassroots organization focused on increasing awareness about wellness and sustainability in urban communities.

Its organizers identified music as the key to drawing a larger audience for their message, and the inaugural D.C. event brought national acts such as Mississippi rapper Big K.R.I.T. and Michigan singer JMSN to Navy Yard’s Half Street Fairgrounds along with local favorites like DJ and producer Tittsworth and band Black Alley. Read more Green-Age Dream: As Broccoli City Fest Grows, So Does Its Commitment to Healthy Living

Arts Roundup: Blue Chickens and Chocolate Busts Edition

A 15-foot blue chicken is coming to the National Gallery of Art's East Building this summer. [Post]

As are chocolate sculptures. [Arts Desk]

Here's who to catch at Broccoli City Fest this weekend. [DC Music Download] Read more Arts Roundup: Blue Chickens and Chocolate Busts Edition

The National Gallery of Art One-Ups the Hirshhorn With Janine Antoni’s Soap and Chocolate Sculptures

Janine Antoni, "Lick and Lather" (1993–94). Courtesy the National Gallery of Art.

Janine Antoni, "Lick and Lather" (1993). Courtesy the National Gallery of Art.

The National Gallery of Art announced today that the museum has acquired a signature contemporary artwork of the 1990s—and thumped the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in the process.

Janine Antoni's "Lick and Lather" (1993–94) is a textbook example of new sculptural practice. It's a set of self-portrait busts that the artist cast in chocolate and soap and finished by licking and bathing. With this piece, Antoni undermines the timeless nature of the classical marble bust by using materials that aren't designed to stand the test of time. Her fugitive portraits are essential, even iconic feminist artworks. Read more The National Gallery of Art One-Ups the Hirshhorn With Janine Antoni’s Soap and Chocolate Sculptures

‘Teenage Twisted Plot’ at the Alper Initiative for Washington Art, Reviewed

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Kevin MacDonald, "UVATAC (Urban Verbs at the Atlantis Club)." 1978.

Kevin MacDonald is the star of not one but two shows at the American University Museum. In addition to “The Tension of a Suspended Moment," his career retrospective, MacDonald is featured throughout “Teenage Twisted Plot,” an exhibition about the musical side-careers of D.C. visual artists active in the late 1970s and early ‘80s (and vice versa). This show, part of the Alper Initiative for Washington Art—a new, dedicated space for local artists at the American University Museum—is named for MacDonald’s new-wave band, Teenage Twisted Plot. Unlike his retro-modern artworks, MacDonald’s musical collaborations sound like something you might still hear at the 9:30 Club today. Read more ‘Teenage Twisted Plot’ at the Alper Initiative for Washington Art, Reviewed

Photos: Bob Mould and Ted Leo at 9:30 Club

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Two ex-D.C. residents, Bob Mould and Ted Leo performed at the 9:30 Club last night with their usual bluster and volume. Mould, supporting his latest release Patch the Sky pulled from many spots in his musical past, kicking the night off with Sugar's "A Good Idea," and winding down with the night five Hüsker Dü songs ("Something I Learned Today," "Hardly Getting Over It," "Celebrated Summer," "In a Free Land," and "Makes No Sense at All"). Read more Photos: Bob Mould and Ted Leo at 9:30 Club

To Do Today: Bunny Wailer, Storm Large, and Father

cl-thursday-17Long before Bob Marley became an iconic symbol of reggae, he was one of three vocalists in The Wailers, along with Peter Tosh and Bunny Wailer. Today, Wailer is the only surviving member. From 1963 to 1973, the three harmonized on songs they each wrote, backed by some of Jamaica’s top musicians. Wailer burned out after three months on the road in the U.K. and returned to Jamaica. Now touring again, reports from recent gigs note that Wailer has been doing memorable songs from his past like “Trenchtown Rock” and “Easy Skanking.” Not generic Caribbean songcraft, these timeless compositions mesh catchy melodies, passionate vocals, and potent rhythms. Read more >>> Bunny Wailer performs at 8 p.m. at the Howard Theatre, 620 T St. NW. $35–$75. (202) 803-2899. thehowardtheatre.com. (Steve Kiviat)

EAT THIS

Radiator, a cocktail bar attached to the new Kimpton Mason & Rook Hotel in Logan Circle, opens today. The menu spans from lamb belly tacos to gnocchi to kimchi pickles with ice cream sundaes for dessert. The cocktail menu includes twists like the Rickey Goes to Hawaii, a riff on a gin rickey with li hing powder. There's also lot of games like a giant Connect Four, Jenga, and shuffleboard. Read more on Young & Hungry. Radiator, 1430 Rhode Island Ave. NW, (202) 742-3150, radiatordc.com. (Jessica Sidman)

OH AND ALSO

Cabaret singer Storm Large joins the National Symphony Orchestra and conductor James Gaffigan for a concert performance of the Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill musical The Seven Deadly Sins. 7 p.m. at 2700 F St. NW. $15–$89. Read more To Do Today: Bunny Wailer, Storm Large, and Father

Virginia Native Jeremy Saulnier Discusses His New Film Green Room and His Punk Rock Upbringing

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Alexandria native Jeremy Saulnier made a name for himself with Blue Ruin, a revenge thriller about a drifter who goes after the paroled convict who wronged his family. The film is lean and efficient, with no wasted shots or lines of dialogue. Green Room is the follow-up to Blue Ruin, and represents an evolution in Saulnier’s work. It's about a young punk band from Arlington and how they end up in a deadly stand-off against a coldhearted neo-Nazi (played by Patrick Stewart) and his thugs. If Blue Ruin is more of a slow burn, Green Room is a pressure cooker. By casting a fresh-faced cast as the punk band—Anton Yelchin is the bassist, while Alia Shawkat is the guitarist—it’s all the more harrowing when they run out of options and pick up whatever weapons they can find. Recently, Arts Desk talked with Saulnier about his process, how he achieves authenticity, and the Dead Kennedys. Read more Virginia Native Jeremy Saulnier Discusses His New Film Green Room and His Punk Rock Upbringing

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